Misfitmorgan's Journal - That Summer Dust

farmerjan

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@Bruce ; That is the difference between true "farming states" and places like the NE states. I am not sure about some of the north eastern states, but I do know that in VT and maybe NH ( I think) you have to have license plates for the farm tractors and the snowmobiles.... Here we simply have to have a "FARM USE" plate on a vehicle if it meets certain qualifications.... and naturally you should have it insured for at least liability.... but they are covered under many farm policies. There are no tags required for tractors or wagons or trailers or other equipment. No Charge for the farm use tag.... I think WVA has a permanent farm use type tag that costs a minimal amount. It costs me about $200 a year to have liability on the truck with farm use plates.....and to add more than the 5, I think, that are covered on the farm policy is about $100. per vehicle per year.
Then there are also "Farm Vehicle tags" that many put on their trucks that are used for more than the 50 miles allowed on the farm use tags.... they cost half what the regular license plates cost..... many farmers have at least one of their trucks with Farm Vehicle tags, and then the plain farm use on the ones that are used just for strictly short distance farm use.
We don't have to inspect the farm use vehicles.... but they should have the basic operating equipment working...brakes, etc.... but technically don't even have to have working lights if they are not on the road when it is dark. Many have that old rusted up pickup that still runs to haul feed down the road to the other pasture or haul hay from the hay field up the road a few miles to the barn and such. Usable, but not really "road worthy", for going too far.
The slow moving vehicle "triangle" is on the back of most tractors and wagons and trailers and such that do not operate at normal road speed....
 

misfitmorgan

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With all those trucks, at least something will be running. In 2018, we had major break downs on everything. The truck and car were both down at the same time. The Kawasaki mule broke down. The only thing we had running was the tractor. Our daughter and son in law’s cars were broke down too. He got one of their cars fixed. A neighbor and co worker broke her foot and couldn’t drive, so he used her car to take them both to work. DD’s car ran, not well but enough to get to work and home, so they put off fixing it and gave us DSIL’s car to drive. It was a costly year! DH’s truck needed work FOUR TIMES! None were less than a thousand bucks. Credit cards got severely abused.....

Congratulations on the new to you truck. The price is great and it will be a good truck for y’all.

That was a big part of it....more vehicles more options. Atm my 2014 cruze needs to go get a new catalytic converter put into it which will need it to be at the shop for probly a week....they wont be working on it that whole time of course but it will sit there for a day before they even look at it, then a day or two to get parts, then the work, then probly picked up the day after....which is why I have held off doing it. So now we have another vehicle I can drive if we need it. The 88 ford dump bed is a stick shift and I dont know how to drive a stick shift....yes I know I should and DH is teaching me but it's not a quick learning experience. So in the meantime a truck I can drive is good.

Congrats on the truck. That is a good price and I fully understand having an "extra vehicle". We have "lots" of trucks too.... and there is always at least a couple that are running, and a couple that need work. And at some point, it will be a godsend to have something to drive when all else seems to go wrong... like @Baymule and her DH ran into that year.... I went through it too awhile back... and still don't have my little 4x4 ranger running yet. I am still thinking seriously about putting a new rebuilt engine in my forrester because it is otherwise in very good shape and the newer stuff is just way too expensive to fix and costs way too much to buy.
You are right that it is in very good shape for the age and the salt situation in the north. Like up in New England, my dad's truck was so body rusted that it wouldn't pass inspection so DS got it for parts/engine etc., for our other vehicles. The road chemicals eat them up I know.

Chemicals and salt are really tough on vehicles here, that is what is killing our 99 F-250. The bed was so rusted it was saggin down on the tires which is why it was parked for a bit in 2019, DH ripped off the bed and put a flat bed on it. Now it has almost 600k miles on it(it is diesel) so it needs new spider gears, it also needs a new cab truely after DH rolled it in early 2018 I think it was. The 88 ford dump truck needs a new cab but again we needed a second running vehicle for the cab swap to be done. The 08 s-10 needs a new motor as I mentioned and we have the motor but the guy who is swapping it for us is still busy for another month at least and DH doesnt have time to swap the motors right now if we want to get anything done on the farm. We did look at newer trucks but esp right now every truck you find that is newer is mega bucks cause truck supplies are low. There is a 2000 silverado, almost the same truck with 40k less miles on it for 6k sitting at the local dealership right now, so $1500 was a super deal.

Doesn't it get a bit expensive paying for registration and insurance on so many vehicles?

Yes and no. Registration is about $120/yr per vehicle, it does go by MSRP of vehicle so like my car is $114, the dump truck has never been registered, and the new truck is not registered yet. The F-250 registration was about $136/yr but it is not registered atm, the s-10 is not registered atm. We have no inspection in michigan. The insurance for the dump truck and the new truck are PLPD and my car is full coverage, total it is $198/month for all 3 with roadside assistance for all of them and $500 deductible. So this is how it works, atm secretary of state only does appointments, so the state waived the need for registration, as to get an appointment atm the earliest you can get in is july 2nd. So lots of vehicles without registration. We get insurance on vehicles we will drive regulary, so my car, the tonner and the new truck. When things go back to normal if we need to drive another vehicle we get 30 day registration which is $20, then we call the insurance company and get 30 days of insurance which varies but is usually about $25. If we wanted things to be cheaper there are farm insurance companies we could use that will give temporary coverage for as little as 3 days and its around $5/day. So far we dont use the F-250 because it needs work done and the s-10 had never been on the road while we have owned it.

There are farm tags are $20 per vehicle for a year however we do not legally qualify as a farm in michigan atm. They also have a restrictions depending on registration type. There are 3 options.
Option 1 - $20 farm plate - must be a truck, used solely for moving livestock bedding, livestock feed, or transporting feed from storage place to storage place(includes feed mills)
Option 2 - 74 cents per 100lbs(empty weight) plus $8 fee - any farm truck, used exclusive in connection with farming activities to include transportation of the farmer and his/her family to all destination needed ex grocery store, doctors, feed mill, fields, etc. May not be used for "hire" jobs. Can be in an individual, company or corporations name.
Option 3 - temporary farm plate - choose from 3-12 months same restrictions as option 2, pay 1/10 the yearly fee for each month plus $8 fee plus $10 service fee.

To be a farm legally in michigan, you have bascially two options.
1. “A farm of 40 or more acres in one ownership, with 51% or more of the land area devoted to an agricultural use.”
2. “A farm of 5 acres or more in one ownership, but less than 40 acres, with 51% or more of the land area devoted to an agricultural use, that has produced a gross annual income from agriculture of $200.00 per year or more per acre of cleared and tillable land. A farm described in this subparagraph enrolled in a federal acreage set aside program or a federal conservation reserve program is considered to have produced a gross annual income from agriculture of $200 per year or more per acre of cleared and tillable land.”

We do not own 40 acres obviously, so option 1 is out. There is a third specialty option which we do no qualify for, and a 4th option which we could use in the future if farm land is owned by us but not adjoining our home parcel. Option 2 is currently our only option, we own 12 acres however it is not yet 51% farm use atm...hence the pastures we are building. We can't claim $200/acre profit until we have over 6 acres fenced and available/used for farm activity and make a profit of at least $1,200/yr. Once we are legally a farm we can also use solely farm insurance for all vehicles used at least 50% for farm use, farm insurance is much much cheaper.

So yes it costs us more for more vehicles, no it is not a lot more. If/when we legally become a farm in the eyes of the state the costs will be low enough to not matter much anymore. For far tags you can up to 10 vehicles, for farm insurance there is not a limit but if you have over 5 vehicles insured you move to a commercial account which has big discounts. We also have permanent trailer plates, So you buy/pay for a plate once for a trailer (highway speeds) and that plate is good for the life of the trailer so long as you own it. The plates go by empty weight, but it's cheap 0-2,499lbs is $75, 2,500-9,999lbs is $200 and over 10,000lbs is $300. So you can have a very large livestock trailer pay your $200 for the plate once and use it for 10-15yrs...sometime more depending on the farmer. One local guy has two livestock trailers he has had for 25yrs and still uses them both.

Basically normally we will not have more then 3 vehicles plated and insured at one time. Our insurance without the tonner is quite a bit cheaper because it is a commercial truck, full coverage for my car and PLPD on the F-250 was $96/month.....my car and the tonner was $145/month, the new truck adds $53/month. We could also pay by the 6 months if we wanted it cheaper which we will probly start doing when the policys get reupped in August.

Sorry that answer is so long but it's all kind of complex.

Also on a side note.....all farm plates here say "log truck".....no idea why they went that route :lol:
 
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misfitmorgan

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So far we are very happy with our new truck!!!
We drove it home thursday night from about 2hrs away and did some running around locally. Friday it drove 6hrs round trip to pick up our new tractor, plus about 45 mins locally getting ready. It pulled the tractor and car trailer beautifully even up some steep hills without any struggle. DH did change all fluids and check everything over yesterday morning before the trip so it would be all topped up on everything. DH also picked up no door bushing for all 4 doors cause they are cheap and he said might as well do all 4 doors. Thos should be getting installed today or tomorrow. One of the best parts it did all that driving yesterday on less then 1 tank of gas, thats half the trip with an 2,000lb car hauler behind it and the other half with 5,000lbs behind it. To be fair the truck can tow up to 11,000lbs so it didnt really care about our tiny 5k behind it lol.

The truck today was used to haul 17 tires to the county wide clean up which DH volunteers at every other year(only happens every other year). First 5 tires are free then it is $1 per tire after that, so people save up their old tires instead of paying $5/tire at the local dump.

I think it's safe to say if that truck makes it a year we have gotten our moneys worth out of it and I wouldnt think it owed me anything. So far current plans are to fix a very slight oil leak and a very slight rear fluid leak, fix the door bushings and the couple door handles....otherwise she is great as is. DH also mentioned shocks as a possible thing, for our comfort which is only $70 for the full set. The oil leak is so slight it doesnt even drip on the ground and the rear fluid leak just means we need to pay attention to rear fluid before hauling, so no rush on those really. If she makes it over a year we will look at some body work for the rust.

Overall just really happy with the purchase!! :weee
 

farmerjan

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We have similar restrictions on the different type of farm tags.... only our farm use "step one" does not go through the DMV.... the "farm tag" like yours has restrictions on types of use and how much, and then there are standard plates which you can do any/every thing with. Our insurance is not quite as easy to work with as yours, but somewhat similar. Our farm size restrictions are less, and are dependent on income more than acreage. Allows for the smaller "truck garden" farmers that intensively raise vegetables and such.... I think the minimum is 3 or 5 acres... and you have to file schedule F for farm taxes, but that is pretty much all the proof.

Glad the truck is doing what you want and need. I am like you, the subaru outback that my son found for me late last fall, cost 1100 or 1300 ; I don"t remember.... but if I get the year out of it, it is paid for in my book. $100 a month more or less and that is cheaper than renting a vehicle and I can do whatever I want with it. I am diligent with checking the oil as they seem to "lose oil", and then the engine blows.... and I haven't found a leak but it does need a little every 2-3 fillups. It has a slight ticking, DS said a lifter, but some engine additive has quieted that somewhat. It does not get the mileage that my 2wd ranger gets, but has a few perks... like heated seats this winter, and drives good. I put new tires on it and new rear brakes. But that is maintenance stuff I have to put on most anything sometime or other. If I take care of it, I ought to get more than a year out of it. My ranger was bought thinking a year or 2.... have had it for 6 at least, 3 deer "incidents", and it gets pretty good mileage. I paid 1100 for that......I have put new tires, a clutch ,throwout bearing, slave cylinder etc., new plugs etc once, and about 100,000 miles. It doesn't owe me a penny but I sure hope it "likes me" enough to keep on trucking as I like that little truck. 4 cyl with 8 plugs (intake and exhaust) so a PITA to change them.... but runs good. I do change the oil fairly regularly and have it serviced - greased etc. - at least twice a year.
Like you, it is worth having.... without having to put a fortune into buying...
Congrats on a great purchase.
 

misfitmorgan

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We have similar restrictions on the different type of farm tags.... only our farm use "step one" does not go through the DMV.... the "farm tag" like yours has restrictions on types of use and how much, and then there are standard plates which you can do any/every thing with. Our insurance is not quite as easy to work with as yours, but somewhat similar. Our farm size restrictions are less, and are dependent on income more than acreage. Allows for the smaller "truck garden" farmers that intensively raise vegetables and such.... I think the minimum is 3 or 5 acres... and you have to file schedule F for farm taxes, but that is pretty much all the proof.

Glad the truck is doing what you want and need. I am like you, the subaru outback that my son found for me late last fall, cost 1100 or 1300 ; I don"t remember.... but if I get the year out of it, it is paid for in my book. $100 a month more or less and that is cheaper than renting a vehicle and I can do whatever I want with it. I am diligent with checking the oil as they seem to "lose oil", and then the engine blows.... and I haven't found a leak but it does need a little every 2-3 fillups. It has a slight ticking, DS said a lifter, but some engine additive has quieted that somewhat. It does not get the mileage that my 2wd ranger gets, but has a few perks... like heated seats this winter, and drives good. I put new tires on it and new rear brakes. But that is maintenance stuff I have to put on most anything sometime or other. If I take care of it, I ought to get more than a year out of it. My ranger was bought thinking a year or 2.... have had it for 6 at least, 3 deer "incidents", and it gets pretty good mileage. I paid 1100 for that......I have put new tires, a clutch ,throwout bearing, slave cylinder etc., new plugs etc once, and about 100,000 miles. It doesn't owe me a penny but I sure hope it "likes me" enough to keep on trucking as I like that little truck. 4 cyl with 8 plugs (intake and exhaust) so a PITA to change them.... but runs good. I do change the oil fairly regularly and have it serviced - greased etc. - at least twice a year.
Like you, it is worth having.... without having to put a fortune into buying...
Congrats on a great purchase.
The specialty option here for farm tags covers those small intensive operations, basically if you have a really small acerage but you produce a really high ag production with good profits you can legally be a farm so long as you do the Schedule F to show it and it is your main income source. Which is nice for people who do the small scale produce farms or vineyards etc. We do have a few local vineyards who team up with each other and some other farmers to produce wines that are local but sourced from several small farms which includes all types of fruits not just grapes.

We have a few people we know who don't get the concept of the old run down trucks. They keep telling us just buy a new truck and it will last you 10 or 15 years....yes that true but I would never buy a brand new truck or a year or two old to just mess it up with farming and have to worry about everything that will make a possible ding or scratch or dirty the interior. MY 2014 cruze is a perfect example of this, it is a very nice little car with leather interior, heated seats lots of bells and whistles etc, but any time it gets dirty I cringe and it stresses me out. These same folks are the ones who call us to do the dirty work with our old trucks because they dont want their 2019 or 2020 trucks messed up. So they basically are paying an arm and a leg for trucks they cant even use to do the farming they want to do. One of our really good friends finally saw the logic in it and bought an old beat up truck of his own and is soooo happy with it, he even told us you guys are right cause I dont care at all what happens to that truck and it is a relief.
 

farmerjan

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With the cost of new nowadays, you cannot afford to use a truck like a truck.... it destroys the resale value of it.
When someone says something to us about getting a new truck, we look at them and say, okay, what happens the first piece of equipment that gets put in the bed and scratches it up, or a dent when a cow backs into it and the metal today just kinks.... then it takes that 50,000 truck value down unless we spend a small fortune to fix it.... and they seldom last long enough to justify the amount of interest paid on it when you finance it.....

And the biggest thing for me now is the D@#N personal property taxes on newer vehicles.... Why do I have to pay huge taxes because I upgraded the vehicle I am driving... I paid enough taxes when I bought it.... and I have to keep paying my locality for HAVING a NICE VEHICLE. How does my NICE VEHICLE change the condition of the locality???? How does my old "beater" vehicle change the condition of the locality????
I am not out to impress anyone with what I drive. I need it to run, to get me where I want to go in a timely fashion and comparative safety. I also don't need to be paying a ton in payments, extra money paid out in interest payments, that I can better put into my farm or something.

So, I will never own a new vehicle again unless I win a huge lottery. I bought a new 1979 leftover f-150 2wd supercab in the fall of 1979 after I got divorced.... for around 3,000. I got the plymouth duster out of the divorce and I had the animals....used the duster for everything, but hauling feed and Hay was just too much. Made payments. Hated the first few scratches it got, then used it as a truck for everything. But that was it.

Anything over 20 yrs old here local, are "aged out" of the personal property taxes. So, that's the way I go. No loans, no interest payments, no personal property taxes, no worries about a little scratch.... and most can be worked on by some of the regular mechanics.....

And the straight shift vehicles can still be parked on a hill and rolled if there is a problem with getting them started in a pinch. My outback is automatic... the forrester was too... a godsend for the ankle replacement.... will probably help with the knee replacements in the beginning too.... but I like my straight drive vehicles.
 

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Some years back, we were picking up hay when we spotted an old truck out in the hay field. our hay guy had a repair shop at his house and he kept busy. We asked about the truck and he said the transmission was out of it, literally, it was in the back of the truck. The owner didn't have the money to fix it. upside of it, we bought it for $400. It turned out to be a Chevy 1500 stepside, I think it was an 1984 Silverado, not sure on the year, but it was a collectors item. We had the transmission put in, little things fixed, it drove great. But there was that collectors thing, turned out to be valuable. I wanted an old beater truck, not a collectors truck. We were buying this place, I was at a crossroads of further fixing up a super cool truck or putting up fence, barn, etc. Y'all know what I chose. We sold the truck for $5000 and I started buying T-posts, gates and wire. So much for me a beater truck. Guess I don't need one. DH's truck is a 2004 F250 Lariat Diesel that I bought for him when I worked for Ford, at invoice. Since we are retired and always go everywhere together, I don't need a truck. But sometimes I think about that Chevy and how cool it would have been to have it painted and redo the inside. Its more cool to have fence.
 

misfitmorgan

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Some years back, we were picking up hay when we spotted an old truck out in the hay field. our hay guy had a repair shop at his house and he kept busy. We asked about the truck and he said the transmission was out of it, literally, it was in the back of the truck. The owner didn't have the money to fix it. upside of it, we bought it for $400. It turned out to be a Chevy 1500 stepside, I think it was an 1984 Silverado, not sure on the year, but it was a collectors item. We had the transmission put in, little things fixed, it drove great. But there was that collectors thing, turned out to be valuable. I wanted an old beater truck, not a collectors truck. We were buying this place, I was at a crossroads of further fixing up a super cool truck or putting up fence, barn, etc. Y'all know what I chose. We sold the truck for $5000 and I started buying T-posts, gates and wire. So much for me a beater truck. Guess I don't need one. DH's truck is a 2004 F250 Lariat Diesel that I bought for him when I worked for Ford, at invoice. Since we are retired and always go everywhere together, I don't need a truck. But sometimes I think about that Chevy and how cool it would have been to have it painted and redo the inside. Its more cool to have fence.
Ironically DHs baby and the truck he drove when I met him was a 1984 chevy 1500. He still owns it, but it has a 450hp engine in it so it guzzles the gas. He still has plans to finish rebuilding the rest of it and has a spare crated engine in case he ever needs it. We also have the 1999 F-250 lariat that is diesel too.....seems like we like the same typs of vehicles lol.

Not sure how this frendship with our 4lbs chihuahua mix and Jupiter is going to go once she is full grown. For now they are buddies and play mates.
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