Mystang's Homesteading Circus

Bruce

Herd Master
Joined
Feb 4, 2016
Messages
12,022
Reaction score
28,364
Points
713
Location
NW Vermont
I've seen videos where every step is a pass with the tractor, mow, ted, rake, bale, accumulate, pick up the bale square and place it on a flatbed. Most recently I saw one where the rake, bale and accumulate steps were combined into one pass. Must take a pretty powerful tractor to pull all three machines at one time but sure cuts down on time needed. I'm sure it also helps remove much of the decision making on how to spend extra money since there won't be any for a long time ;).
 

mystang89

True BYH Addict
Joined
Jun 23, 2012
Messages
901
Reaction score
1,408
Points
268
Location
Charlestown IN
I've seen videos where every step is a pass with the tractor, mow, ted, rake, bale, accumulate, pick up the bale square and place it on a flatbed. Most recently I saw one where the rake, bale and accumulate steps were combined into one pass. Must take a pretty powerful tractor to pull all three machines at one time but sure cuts down on time needed. I'm sure it also helps remove much of the decision making on how to spend extra money since there won't be any for a long time ;).
When does the hay have time to dry?
 

Bruce

Herd Master
Joined
Feb 4, 2016
Messages
12,022
Reaction score
28,364
Points
713
Location
NW Vermont
They ted it first, then rake, bale, accumulate. I'm no haymaker but I gather that it is supposed to be dry after tedding or it shouldn't be raked and baled. BUT there is some sort of chemical you can spray on it to keep it from molding after baling if it is just a bit not dry enough. Based on moisture content and sprayed on the hay before it is baled. I expect that is another not cheap machine. In the video I saw, the guy had a moisture meter in the cab of the tractor that was reading moisture content as the hay was picked up by the baler.
 

farmerjan

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 16, 2016
Messages
2,616
Reaction score
7,653
Points
378
Location
virginia
Haymaking doesn't pay enough to warrant those costs unless you are getting into custom work; or you have some very high quality alfalfa that is in some of the western states that is irrigated, and the weather allows for it to be cut every 28-35 days and dried perfect in the no humidity weather, and you have a market for it. Alot of alfalfa is shipped overseas believe it or not. There are probably some other markets, but the thing is to afford equipment like that you need the markets and the product to sell. Quality is everything when you are getting premium prices. Our weather here really is too "IFFY" to really justify that kind of investment. We could control the irrigation so it got perfect water amounts required(until we had a wet year like last year).... but can't control the weather to get it made on time. That is where the more arid west has a lock on it. But then the water costs are through the sky.....
If tedded out, and the weather co-operates, then yes you can rake, bale and accumulate all in one pass. And yes, you need a good sized tractor to run it. But the accumulator runs on its own power, it is not dependent on the tractor or PTO. If pulling a rake, then the baler probably has it's own power/motor. It couldn't run off a PTO from the tractor either. But you would need a decent amount of HP just to keep it all moving along smoothly.
I was raking just 2 windrows ahead of my son on the one orchard grass field that one evening. It was dry, and I got 4 windrows, when the sky turned black. He got there with the baler and told me to only have 2 rows ahead of him in case it did rain, I wouldn't have to tedd out the whole field again. We were lucky and got it all baled and then it rained later. The 14 wheel v rake ( 7 on a side) was putting 2 rows together. Did a nearly 12 acre field in less than 3 hours, with me slowing my speed to not get too far ahead of him. I could have gotten it raked in about 2 1/2. But it basically a straight shot, open field, just a little gradual slope. Makes a difference when you are not raking around corners, or obstacles like rocks, trees, ledges and such that TEAR UP a baler.
 

mystang89

True BYH Addict
Joined
Jun 23, 2012
Messages
901
Reaction score
1,408
Points
268
Location
Charlestown IN
Did a nearly 12 acre field in less than 3 hours
Took me nearly 3 hours just to make my 3 acres or so into a windrow lol. But I'm ok with that. It felt great finally being able to make my own hay, from my own pasture, for my own sheep.

I think after all was said and done I ended up with somewhere around 60+ bales although many of those were far too loose. I'll need to work on where to adjust the tentioner when I do it again.
 

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
16,281
Reaction score
38,195
Points
793
Location
Northeast Texas
Took me nearly 3 hours just to make my 3 acres or so into a windrow lol. But I'm ok with that. It felt great finally being able to make my own hay, from my own pasture, for my own sheep.

I think after all was said and done I ended up with somewhere around 60+ bales although many of those were far too loose. I'll need to work on where to adjust the tentioner when I do it again.
:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap:clap

Your own hay, from your own pasture for your own sheep. Stand up and be proud. Loose rolled or not, that is a major accomplishment. :yesss:
 

Bruce

Herd Master
Joined
Feb 4, 2016
Messages
12,022
Reaction score
28,364
Points
713
Location
NW Vermont
Took me nearly 3 hours just to make my 3 acres or so into a windrow lol. But I'm ok with that. It felt great finally being able to make my own hay, from my own pasture, for my own sheep.

I think after all was said and done I ended up with somewhere around 60+ bales although many of those were far too loose. I'll need to work on where to adjust the tentioner when I do it again.
This is your first shot at making hay, yes? I'd guess you did pretty well for the first time, plenty to learn as you go through the steps. I would bet it goes faster and with fewer problems next time.
 

mystang89

True BYH Addict
Joined
Jun 23, 2012
Messages
901
Reaction score
1,408
Points
268
Location
Charlestown IN
This is your first shot at making hay, yes? I'd guess you did pretty well for the first time, plenty to learn as you go through the steps. I would bet it goes faster and with fewer problems next time.
I don't know about faster, but I wouldn't mind fewer mistakes.:D
 
Top