New and could use lots of tips!

Vkp23

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And they are guaranteed to get the girls pregnant when you don't want them to. And yes, I have heard that they can do it through a fence. :lol:
omg! Through a fence! Holy crap. 🤦🏻‍♀️ Well what would be considered full grown? I haven’t a clue like how big they are gonna get. I mean I have an idea, but don’t know for sure. I just didn’t know if there was like some kind of sweet spot to wait for. Like you know too young will kill them and too old will kill them. I suppose it can be another one of those “I’ll cross that bridge when I get to it” kind of deals like on if we want to eat any of the ones we raise or sell them. I guess the main thing is I don’t want them to have babies too early for them or too late. Would this mean I should separate them when I bring them home? The oldest ones I’m bringing home are 4 months. They are def not full grown. Is it still safe, for now, to let them be together?

one last thing, our lawn mower broke like a month ago. We got a new one finally but now the hubby and I are trying to decide how to handle the yard since the goats are coming in. I was saying to mow and dry the grass out like hay in hopes they will eat it. He says to leave it and let the goats eat It. This grass is like 2.5-3 feet tall. 😂😂 thankfully chase has bored out his pathways. Lol. He does play in the grass though. Should we just cut it and rake it up and let them go at the shrubby around the fence and what ever starts growing or leave it and let them eat it?
 

Baymule

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I’m with your husband on this one. Let the goats graze it and buy good hay.

Separate ASAP!

I’ve butchered chickens ahogs. I take lambs to slaughter, I just can’t kill them. I’m pretty tough but I do have my soft spots. LOL

I did castrate the boys with a knife at 1-2 weeks old and name them dinner. Then Covid happened, all of a sudden everyone wants to be a farmer and slaughter dates are over a YEAR out. How can I set a date on an animal that has not yet even been conceived??? So the 2020 ram lambs went to auction. Some of the ewe lambs did too, plus I culled the flock of 6 grown ewes, kept 6 grown ewes. I kept 7 ewe lambs that will be ready to breed in September or October. We bought 2 registered young ewes and they will be bred too.

If I had to, I’d suck it up and slaughter a lamb myself, but so far I haven’t had to.
I name my animals. The pigs we raise are all named. The steer we raised last winter was named Goldie. Obviously 73 Cornish Cross chickens aren’t named, but I pray over every one of them on slaughter day.

Yes, you will have to give it thought. Tell your children that the goats are for milk and meat. Tell them from the start the boys will be dinner. They will be so cute and adorable as babies, but what would you do with 10 of them all grown up? Believe me, I know cute! I speak from experience. Love them, enjoy them, care for them and treat them well. Give them the BEST life. They will have 1 bad day, actually not even a day, just a short trip to the slaughter place.

I hope this helps put things into perspective for you.
 

Alaskan

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Well what would be considered full grown? I haven’t a clue like how big they are gonna get.
Then figure out when they were born, and don't let them get bred until they are at least 10 months old or older.

Don't worry about being "too old" to breed.

but yes, by 4 months of age they could start trying to get pregnant.

This grass is like 2.5-3 feet tall.
They they probably will not eat it. Too tall and tough.

I would cut it. You can dry it and see if they will eat it... or just use it as bedding.
 

Vkp23

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I’m with your husband on this one. Let the goats graze it and buy good hay.

Separate ASAP!

I’ve butchered chickens ahogs. I take lambs to slaughter, I just can’t kill them. I’m pretty tough but I do have my soft spots. LOL

I did castrate the boys with a knife at 1-2 weeks old and name them dinner. Then Covid happened, all of a sudden everyone wants to be a farmer and slaughter dates are over a YEAR out. How can I set a date on an animal that has not yet even been conceived??? So the 2020 ram lambs went to auction. Some of the ewe lambs did too, plus I culled the flock of 6 grown ewes, kept 6 grown ewes. I kept 7 ewe lambs that will be ready to breed in September or October. We bought 2 registered young ewes and they will be bred too.

If I had to, I’d suck it up and slaughter a lamb myself, but so far I haven’t had to.
I name my animals. The pigs we raise are all named. The steer we raised last winter was named Goldie. Obviously 73 Cornish Cross chickens aren’t named, but I pray over every one of them on slaughter day.

Yes, you will have to give it thought. Tell your children that the goats are for milk and meat. Tell them from the start the boys will be dinner. They will be so cute and adorable as babies, but what would you do with 10 of them all grown up? Believe me, I know cute! I speak from experience. Love them, enjoy them, care for them and treat them well. Give them the BEST life. They will have 1 bad day, actually not even a day, just a short trip to the slaughter place.

I hope this helps put things into perspective for you.
That is actually a very lovely way to think about it. The big girls (16 & 13) would understand, but I think I would rather tell the little kids that we sold them to someone. At least until they are old enough to not be bothered by it. Chickens would be one thing. They wouldn’t care much at all about chickens that are being raised for food….goats on the other hand…I’ll have to wait til they are better able to understand. Thomas (my husband) is reluctant to eat the goats. He’s concerned goat meat is nasty. 😂😂. What does it taste like? He said if they taste good they are in trouble. Lol 😂

I think I can better handle raising an animal to eat as long as I didn’t have to do the slaughtering. It actually would be pretty nice to be able to request bits and pieces saved up as food for the carnivorous pets we have.

We’ve always wanted our own little farm. We loved it when we had chickens years and years ago. We have our greens we love. We def want to have them again. Where we are is just not as great a place anymore with the subdivision behind us moving in closer. I would ultimately love to farm alpacas or llamas. We will see what happens further down the road. Our oldest having this agriculture project was the catalyst I needed to convince him to let me finally get some goats. 😂
 

Vkp23

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Then figure out when they were born, and don't let them get bred until they are at least 10 months old or older.

Don't worry about being "too old" to breed.

but yes, by 4 months of age they could start trying to get pregnant.


They they probably will not eat it. Too tall and tough.

I would cut it. You can dry it and see if they will eat it... or just use it as bedding.
That is an EXCELLENT idea! Ugh I HATE waste and try not to waste as much as possible. If I can use that grass for something, I would love to! Ok, so if the 3 oldest goats are around 4 months old…they should be roughly old enough around….February…?
 

animalmom

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Your goats will need the CDT shot yearly. It is quite inexpensive and is given sub-Q.

Regarding butchering at home. Most of us start out saying we well do our own butchering be it chicken, rabbit, goat or pig. The first few times it is difficult but you do your utmost to make sure the death is swift and painless. I don't think it ever gets "easy" and I'm not sure I really want to know someone who thinks it is "easy". We love our animals. All of mine have been born on the property. I was there from the time they first drew breath, but reality is harsh. We can not keep every animal born and I'd rather put some in the freezer than sell.

We had a banner hatching with the Muscovy ducks this spring, two hatches totaling 28 ducklings. We just finished putting 12 of those drakes in the freezer. Hard, yes but better for the flock and better for us.

We also raise rabbits and used to play tricks on us that we raise rabbits and put hasse in the freezer (Hasse is German for rabbit.) We thought that way we would not be eating something we knew. We've gotten past that now.

We don't have children but I caution you to be frank with your children regarding the relationship animals have with their plate. Meat does not miraculously appear cradled in cellophane on a styrofoam tray. Children can handle a lot, especially if you are truthful. Something I read about home butchering and children is those folks would butcher a rabbit and put it in the freezer until the children forgot about it. Then they would have it for dinner as it was by then an unnamed rabbit.

Raising livestock is an excellent way to introduce children to what life is really like: messy, dirty, funny, exciting, happy, sad and tasty. Enjoy your animals and your children. You, my dear, are doubly blessed.
 

animalmom

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Holy Batman woman, that mineral is $42.99 for 10 measly pounds?????

The copper is good, but I (in my most regal opinion :) ) think the calcium/phosphorus ratio is not the best. It should be 2 to 1 cal to phos.

Here's the mineral I use, you pay for shipping https://www.newcountryorganics.com/healthy-organic-minerals-for-goats-50-lb-bag.html

$36 for a 50 lb bag. Shipping is another 22 which brings it up to $55 for 50 lbs which is still a better deal.

These folks have a shipping location in VA so the shipping charge may be different.

Just trying to be helpful. Don't get mad, please.
 

Alaskan

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Your goats will need the CDT shot yearly. It is quite inexpensive and is given sub-Q.

Regarding butchering at home. Most of us start out saying we well do our own butchering be it chicken, rabbit, goat or pig. The first few times it is difficult but you do your utmost to make sure the death is swift and painless. I don't think it ever gets "easy" and I'm not sure I really want to know someone who thinks it is "easy". We love our animals. All of mine have been born on the property. I was there from the time they first drew breath, but reality is harsh. We can not keep every animal born and I'd rather put some in the freezer than sell.

We had a banner hatching with the Muscovy ducks this spring, two hatches totaling 28 ducklings. We just finished putting 12 of those drakes in the freezer. Hard, yes but better for the flock and better for us.

We also raise rabbits and used to play tricks on us that we raise rabbits and put hasse in the freezer (Hasse is German for rabbit.) We thought that way we would not be eating something we knew. We've gotten past that now.

We don't have children but I caution you to be frank with your children regarding the relationship animals have with their plate. Meat does not miraculously appear cradled in cellophane on a styrofoam tray. Children can handle a lot, especially if you are truthful. Something I read about home butchering and children is those folks would butcher a rabbit and put it in the freezer until the children forgot about it. Then they would have it for dinner as it was by then an unnamed rabbit.

Raising livestock is an excellent way to introduce children to what life is really like: messy, dirty, funny, exciting, happy, sad and tasty. Enjoy your animals and your children. You, my dear, are doubly blessed.
Excellent points.

I have 5 boys, and they grew up with animals, the entire life cycle, and butchering.

None of them like slaughtering, but understand that it has to be done.

I do have one kid that can't bring himself to do the actual kill, so he does gutting and clean up instead.

None of my kids had or have issues with eating the animals. Once it is dead, especially once the head is off, it is meat and meat is yummy.

I do think complete honesty with kids is important. Anything else ends up being all kinds of trouble further down the road.

As to taste..... most of that is cooking.

My kids are currently 22 (almost 23) down to 13.
 

messybun

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That is actually a very lovely way to think about it. The big girls (16 & 13) would understand, but I think I would rather tell the little kids that we sold them to someone. At least until they are old enough to not be bothered by it. Chickens would be one thing. They wouldn’t care much at all about chickens that are being raised for food….goats on the other hand…I’ll have to wait til they are better able to understand. Thomas (my husband) is reluctant to eat the goats. He’s concerned goat meat is nasty. 😂😂. What does it taste like? He said if they taste good they are in trouble. Lol 😂

I think I can better handle raising an animal to eat as long as I didn’t have to do the slaughtering. It actually would be pretty nice to be able to request bits and pieces saved up as food for the carnivorous pets we have.

We’ve always wanted our own little farm. We loved it when we had chickens years and years ago. We have our greens we love. We def want to have them again. Where we are is just not as great a place anymore with the subdivision behind us moving in closer. I would ultimately love to farm alpacas or llamas. We will see what happens further down the road. Our oldest having this agriculture project was the catalyst I needed to convince him to let me finally get some goats. 😂

My neighbor raised meat pigs. Her daughter (2) named it hotdog. The next ones were successively named similar. Good child, but dang could she ever separate herself from food. I think part of it was being raised around the thought process, and part of it was just individually her. Totally about your kid’s individual personalities.
 

Vkp23

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I know with my oldest, she was very young when we did chickens. She doesn’t have much issue with separating herself from food. The 13 yr old, she’s an odd one anyway. 😂 had no issue yeeting a dead squirrel into the woods.…bare hands. She also threw a dead fish on the younger ones when we went camping this year. Lol. I mean if I really think about it, it’s mostly the 8 yr old boy I’d be a little concerned with. He’s really tender hearted, but then some times he’s pretty tough. We will likely have to just ease into it. The 6 yr old girl…..she freakin nuts anyway. 😂😂 The 3yr old and 1yr old boys wouldn’t know any different if they are brought up in it.

I'm the same when it comes to its head having to be removed. Lol. If it came down to SHTF and my kids starving and I had no other option…I’d do what I have to do. But yes, I don’t want to if I don’t have to. Lol

I do really appreciate the way you guys put things. 😊 it’s a really nice and spiritual way to put it. Thank you very much for the sentiments!

we think the best way to decide if we want to raise them to eat would be to find some goat meat and give it a try. I will have to let you guys know how it goes!
 
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