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Hi. I’m glad to be connected to other people who have an interest in backyard animals. I am 61 and have Nubian dairy goats, buff Orpington chickens and 2 Great Pyrenees dogs. I have a question right out of the gate and I apologize for jumping from intro to question so quickly but my 4 year old momma Nubian has me puzzled and I hope someone has seen this before and can help. She has been this way for several months and has 2 doe kids still nursing. They are 8 months old. I have a short video but can’t upload it. She is weak in the back legs and walks off balance, mainly leaning to the left. Her tail even leans to the left. She eats fine but I can’t put weight on her. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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Welcome to the forum. I am not a goatie, but immediately wean those 8 month old kids! My guess is that she is calcium depleted, seriously calcium depleted, along with other nutrients because everything has been leaving her body in her milk. If you don’t have a mineral mix out free choice, do it now. Also, offer dolomite lime. I buy it at Lowe’s in the garden center. It is sold as garden lime, but read the label to make sure that it is dolomite lime. Lactating animals need it.
That is just my first knee jerk reaction. Get the kids off now.

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I have loose minerals and baking soda out and even installed a divided container to hold them several months ago and they nibbled at it at first but it still has about the same amount so they aren’t eating it. I know her kids need to be weaned ASAP. I will do that. My concerns grew terribly when one of her doe kids started acting in a similar, yet not as pronounced way, yesterday. Last December, when she kidded, I almost lost her to coccidiosis but a lot of meds from the vet and almost $350 later she recovered. All accept this strange gait and being skinny. All the goats (5) look very good with shiny, smooth coats now. Her coat is good too. Is there a way to get calcium and other trace minerals into them without fear of overdose? I am a goat newbie so searching the internet is all I have. I can’t afford more vet bills right now.
 

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If you put the minerals out, they will take what they need.
My concern is that something else is going on. Most of us do our own vet care, it is so expensive and most vets don’t know much about goats or sheep.
@rachels.haven do you have any ideas?
 

rachels.haven

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Alfalfa pellets are good for calcium. Mine are getting them free choice right now and they don't overdo it. You should ease them in though or they will party and get sick, maybe a coffee can at a time. They are basically ground alfalfa hay. Very lite waste.
I second pulling the kids.
I'd be a little worried it's possible she has something scary like meningeal worm or polio or maybe listeriosis with an odd gait and leaning mentioned.
 

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Alfalfa pellets are good for calcium. Mine are getting them free choice right now and they don't overdo it. You should ease them in though or they will party and get sick, maybe a coffee can at a time. They are basically ground alfalfa hay. Very lite waste.
I second pulling the kids.
I'd be a little worried it's possible she has something scary like meningeal worm or polio or maybe listeriosis with an odd gait and leaning mentioned.
Thanks for your reply. You know what? I just read an article on meningeal worm posted here: https://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/meningealworm.html and was wondering what you all think. We got these two pregnant young nubians last summer in August. Prior to that, we had deer coming through our property daily and our 6 1/2 acres has a year round creek bordering our property. Our new fencing excludes the creek now and the dogs keep out the deer now but I wonder if last fall and early winter they could have been infected? It sure sounds possible. Do you all think I should try the aggressive worming treatment?
 

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Alfalfa pellets are good for calcium. Mine are getting them free choice right now and they don't overdo it. You should ease them in though or they will party and get sick, maybe a coffee can at a time. They are basically ground alfalfa hay. Very lite waste.
I second pulling the kids.
I'd be a little worried it's possible she has something scary like meningeal worm or polio or maybe listeriosis with an odd gait and leaning mentioned.
I feed them alfalfa hay from Tractor Supply and have tried the pellets too. I plan on getting a round bale for the alfalfa but I am waiting until I can find really good quality 2nd cutting.
 

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I find the tsc hay too course and blasted for my goats to want to eat it-also very expensive-but that is a source of calcium if free fed and they actually eat it. Whatever works for you!
You may want to move onto ruling out meningeal worm, polio, or listeriosis for the weird very concerning symptoms she's displaying, but calcium and a good protein source is a good first step for conditioning. The next step is running a fecal-maybe looking up meadow mist lab might help you if your vet is too pricy. For me only liver flukes can squeak by in one, but I do my own.
Good grain, good hay, additional alfalfa, and a low worm count are the best you can do for conditioning a goat.

Something I missed, but you may want to rule out cae and johnnes (and cl while you're at it, as it doesn't add much price wise). Wasting and some neurological symptoms can be displayed by affected individuals. If you are dealing with either of those two you are fighting losing battle unfortunately and it's better to know.
 

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A fecal would also tell you if she still has coccidiosis stripping her intestines and making her thin. I wish I could offer more help than that, but that is what I would do.
 

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I find the tsc hay too course and blasted for my goats to want to eat it-also very expensive-but that is a source of calcium if free fed and they actually eat it. Whatever works for you!
You may want to move onto ruling out meningeal worm, polio, or listeriosis for the weird very concerning symptoms she's displaying, but calcium and a good protein source is a good first step for conditioning. The next step is running a fecal-maybe looking up meadow mist lab might help you if your vet is too pricy. For me only liver flukes can squeak by in one, but I do my own.
Good grain, good hay, additional alfalfa, and a low worm count are the best you can do for conditioning a goat.

Something I missed, but you may want to rule out cae and johnnes (and cl while you're at it, as it doesn't add much price wise). Wasting and some neurological symptoms can be displayed by affected individuals. If you are dealing with either of those two you are fighting losing battle unfortunately and it's better to know.
Very good points.

Are her gums pink? (FAMACHA score?)
FAMACHAR-anaemia-guide.png
 

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