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Pregnant cow with cancer.. need advice!

Discussion in 'Diseases & Injuries - Cattle' started by becca renee, Feb 3, 2017.

  1. Feb 3, 2017
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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  2. Feb 3, 2017
    farmerjan

    farmerjan Loving the herd life

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    Hi and welcome to BYH. I see absolutely no reason that the eye can't be removed with just a local. Where are you from? I didn't notice a state or region???? I see no reason why a competent vet couldn't do it but I have not seen the cow so can't judge. It might be gross but can you post a picture?
    Is the cow eating and drinking water normally? Even if it is cancer eye, which is usually more of an oozing, infected messy looking eye, it can be operated on if it hasn't affected the socket.
    Virginia Tech would probably be one place it could be done, and I understand that UMISS is a very good vet college too. We took a mare to Penn state years ago with a squamous cell carcinoma of the inner eyelid and they removed it and I had the mare for about 8-10 more years.
    Still I have a retired vet friend that took a tennis size ball growth off a cows eye lid that had been rubbed raw and was a huge mess. She had a month old calf on her and we were trying to salvage the situation to get the calf to weaning size then ship her. He used a local to numb it and then stitched it after taking off the mess. She not only healed up, but has had 3 calves since then and is preg for the next one. We bought her when a friend sold out of the beef cows, and she is now probably 12 - 14 yrs old.
    I am not a vet, just have a few years in the beef and dairy cow business. You can PM me if you want any other info or post it here on the forum.
    If she is eating and drinking and doesn't seem to be in alot of pain, I see no reason why she can't at least carry full term, but not having seen the cow, or knowing more detail it is hard to say.
     
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  3. Feb 3, 2017
    farmerjan

    farmerjan Loving the herd life

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    I am assuming that the penicillin is to help prevent any secondary infections???
    I really think that getting in touch with a land grant university with a vet or vet tech program would be the way to go. Alot of times they will do stuff as learning/teaching for the students under the supervision of a vet.
    Please post where you are so that maybe I can give you some more options of who/where to call...
    If it is a tumor, are you sure it is cancerous or just fast growing in a bad place? How much experience with this vet do you have and how much experience do they have? I AM NOT KNOCKING THE VET... but age and experience is very important to knowing what can be done. Like our retired vet friend, he has been there, done that, seen an awful lot....and sometimes they have "unconventional ideas" for things...
     
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  4. Feb 3, 2017
    greybeard

    greybeard True BYH Addict

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    I'd sure have the vet on speed dial to do a c-section.

    A friend of mine had a run of lepto in his beef herd some years ago and had a handful of about 30 day preemies. He was able to save all but one. They weighed around 30lbs at birth, mostly full haired. He had to milk, then tube colostrum into them, and I think then had to hold them up to reach momma's teats but other than that they did fine.
     
  5. Feb 4, 2017
    farmerjan

    farmerjan Loving the herd life

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    @greybeard is right, a 30 day premie is saveable, if you do "everything" right and the vet can do a c-section. Them having hair is the thing and then making sure they have as much support as possible. Make sure you have colostrum on hand , if not from a cow, then at least the package kind. And at least 2 feedings of it...although I would go for 3 even though they say they don't get much in the way of immunity after 24 hours, I believe that it still helps with the digestion. I give it to any calves I bring home unless I KNOW FOR SURE THEY HAVE HAD IT.
     
  6. Feb 7, 2017
    cjc

    cjc Loving the herd life

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    I agree, 30 day preemie isn't un savable. I bought a set of preemie twins a few months back and though they were small they are healthy. I did keep them in the barn and such a little longer. You've raised dairy cows so you know what it takes, just common sense when raising the calf and they should be ok. Get colostrum in her belly, keep her warm and be diligent with your care and things like a pneumonia nasal spray, iodine cleaning of the navel and selenium and Vitamin A&D at birth. I would definitely bottle feed this baby from birth.

    The only thing is, is how certain are you on the 30 days. I have had vets way off. Was an ultrasound performed?

    I guess you need to weigh your opportunity cost here and also your love for the cow/calf. If you can get her to hold on a bit longer and get the calf out via C-section then euthanize her that may be a plan but a C-section here runs a minimum $750 and depending on the type of farm you operate that may be worth more than your calf...not sure. I do agree on trying to remove the eye but I have never seen this before. That may get her to hold on long enough for the calf not exactly sure as I have never had this issue.
     
  7. Feb 13, 2017
    greybeard

    greybeard True BYH Addict

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    update or news?
     
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  8. Feb 26, 2017
    farmerjan

    farmerjan Loving the herd life

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    Yes, what has happened?
     
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