Registered VS Unregistered

secuono

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Depends on what you do with them and your local market.

All of mine are 3× & 4× (wtf o_O yes, 4×) registered. I offer unregistered for less, but most get registered at buyer's request, even though most are pets. And only 2 registrations are included in price, more for 3rd or 4th registered.
I haven't found any meat buyers & won't pollute the market with cheap sheep at auctions being reused as breeders, so they're dog food if not sold at my pricing. Yes, I'd sell at current market value for meat buyers, but they'd need to show proof of meat use for the refund.

If you'll only breed for personal meat, then you don't need to register.
If you think you will sell later, buy registered brood stock and only register when buyers want that.


If you'll show them, many require registered sheep, but not all.
 

Britgoes2market

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I
Depends on what you do with them and your local market.

All of mine are 3× & 4× (wtf o_O yes, 4×) registered. I offer unregistered for less, but most get registered at buyer's request, even though most are pets. And only 2 registrations are included in price, more for 3rd or 4th registered.
I haven't found any meat buyers & won't pollute the market with cheap sheep at auctions being reused as breeders, so they're dog food if not sold at my pricing. Yes, I'd sell at current market value for meat buyers, but they'd need to show proof of meat use for the refund.

If you'll only breed for personal meat, then you don't need to register.
If you think you will sell later, buy registered brood stock and only register when buyers want that.


If you'll show them, many require registered sheep, but not all.
Oh thats a great perspective. Thank you!
 

Baymule

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I’ve had sheep for 8 years and started with mixed breed hair sheep. I fell in love with the Katahdin hair sheep breed and am now moving into registered sheep.

What breed are you interested in? Wool or hair breed?
 

Ridgetop

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Buying registered guarantees only that they are registered. It does not guarantee quality. If you buy registered make sure they are not telling you that they "can" be registered or that the parents came from registered stock. You want to see the registration papers to be sure. You should have an idea of what you are looking for when buying so you can ask the right questions.

The main thing to buying your first livestock is knowing the purpose you want them for. If you want milk, don't buy a meat breed cow or goat, but straight dairy. If you don't want to shear don't buy a wool breed sheep. Remember, you can eat anything with potatoes and carrots, but if you want meat, look into a true meat breed of whatever species. Even with chickens, if you want daily egg production some of the fancy and unusual breeds don't lay well, or will lay a clutch and refuse to lay any more - they just want to hatch that clutch. Read everything you can about the species and breeds you think might suit your purpose first - it is cheaper to read about them than to make a mistake buying, feeding and housing the wrong breed.

Just as important is finding a reputable breeder for your first purchase of stock. You need someone that knows the breed/species, has the stock you want or can send you to another good breeder, and has an honest reputation. You want to go to a breeder that has healthy animals and is willing to help you with information.

I buy registered animals for breeding stock because want the benefit of previous breeders know how is producing good animals. There is no benefit to me of replicating years of selective breeding when I can locate and buy breeding stock that have already reached that high standard through someone else's efforts. I will be improving on those lines by adding good stud animals, through selective breeding, selection of replacement breeders, and culling.
 

Mini Horses

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Registrations and purpose go hand in hand. I have both reg & not. Some not are actually full bred. Meat goats that produce for me to sell FOR meat - I'm not caring about papers, just what is produced. Having reg also allows me to know background, production and sales to those wanting reg breeders. It's a balance of purpose, needs and price. My dairy, reg gives me background on milk production that's important to myself and buyers.

So it's a personal choice for reg or commercial herds, your intentions, your market. Size of your operation can dictate your choice. I want DNA on reg animals, too. Years of registry with mini horses , donkeys & goats have given me a view on pro/con at my stage of farming. I'm a wildcard 😂
 

Britgoes2market

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I appreciate all your feedback! :D THANK YOU! I've been stuck because I can purchase commercial lambs that look EXCELLENT!! But this particular breed is not super popular in my area, so I've been struggling on whether to go for the purchase of the unregistered, vs waiting for registered and having a greater market to sell in.....
 

Baymule

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If the breed you choose is not popular, then you may have a hard time selling lambs.

I started 8 years ago with Dorper crossed with Katahdin hair sheep. I never had sheep and didn’t want to kill an expensive registered animal out of ignorance. Now I’m moving into registered Katahdins. I love the breed.

Don’t buy from livestock auctions!!! That’s where people take their culls. Even if they are not sick, they have been exposed to everything. Don’t feel sorry for a skinny pathetic animal and bring it and whatever disease it has to infect your property in what could be contaminated forever.

I could have started with registered sheep, I’m not as stupid as I thought I was. LOL
 

Mini Horses

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Auctions!! Yes, many cull -- except those designated as graded auction, breeders auctions, etc. Know your auctions. Plus, occasionally a farm sellout will happen at them, as well as many young to reduce numbers. Those "can be" a find.

Best tip....KNOW your animal, what to look for, what to pass by. And always quarantine the buy, no matter from where it comes!!
 

Ridgetop

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But this particular breed is not super popular in my area, so I've been struggling on whether to go for the purchase of the unregistered, vs waiting for registered and having a greater market to sell in.....
Why is the breed you want not popular? It could be something as simple as health and parasite resistance for your area. Check it out before focusing on that breed. Like @Baymule says if it is not popular it may be hard for you to sell offspring.

If you are thinking that scarcity in your area would give you a good market to sell breeding stock, remember that it takes a long time to get a good reputation where people will come from long distances to buy from you. And you will have to travel to find new breeding stock to keep a healthy gene pool in your flock/herd.

Where are you located? What breed are you considering?
 
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