1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. Rate this sheep's condition - Featured Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Snuffles?

Discussion in 'Diseases & Injuries - Rabbits' started by SavannahLeigh, Jul 4, 2017.

  1. Jul 5, 2017
    SavannahLeigh

    SavannahLeigh Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2016
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    40
    Trophy Points:
    76
    Location:
    WV
    I don't think we do... Last time we took a goat to the vet to be examined for CL, it took WEEKS for the information to get back to us. We're in a very remote area :rolleyes:
     
  2. Jul 5, 2017
    SavannahLeigh

    SavannahLeigh Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2016
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    40
    Trophy Points:
    76
    Location:
    WV
    In other news, the bunnies are better! None have discharge (Well, they have very clear, unnoticeable discharge) and only 2 have crackly lungs. I think I'll cull those 2 anyway as they are very runty and the others are twice their size.

    Maybe it isn't snuffles then? I'm going to continue treating ALL of my rabbits with ACV and I will continue treating the sickies with VetRX, ACV, and plantain.
     
    DutchBunny03 likes this.
  3. Jul 5, 2017
    SavannahLeigh

    SavannahLeigh Overrun with beasties

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2016
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    40
    Trophy Points:
    76
    Location:
    WV






    I forgot to mention that the feeder I use is NOT a filter feeder. So it doesn't have any way to sift.
     
  4. Jul 5, 2017
    Bunnylady

    Bunnylady True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,072
    Likes Received:
    1,937
    Trophy Points:
    293
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    As with most bacteria, there are many strains of Pasteurella. Some are more virulent than others, so just how badly an animal is affected depends partly on which strain they encounter, and how strong their immune system is. To further complicate matters, not all cases of snuffles are caused by Pasteurella. Many years ago, there was an article in Domestic Rabbit about a study that several commercial breeders participated in. If they saw snuffles symptoms in a rabbit, they took it to the researchers so they could take samples and identify the organism responsible. In a significant percentage of cases, the causative organism turned out to be another bacterium - frequently, it was something that humans normally carry, like Staphylococcus aureus.

    Probably the most aggravating thing about snuffles is how difficult it is to treat. Of course, really severe cases are self-limiting; the animal may die no matter what you do. Milder cases, though, can become chronic; there are a lot of blind pockets in a rabbit's nasal passages where bacteria can hide out. You can treat the animal, sometimes for weeks, and it may stop showing symptoms, but when it experiences some stress (which can even be something as normal as a change of seasons), the symptoms return.

    I'm not sure it's possible to be immune, it's more like "naturally resistant." In science, they use the term "infective dose." Basically, that means the amount of a pathogen an animal has to get in their system to develop the disease. How large that dose is depends partly on how aggressive the organism is, and partly on how aggressively the animal's immune system attacks it. Part of the problem with the vaccine is that, like most vaccines, the resistance it provides isn't permanent (I think they want annual boosters on this one) and even some vaccinated animals can become ill. Animals with naturally tough immune systems aren't just resistant to this disease, they tend not to become ill from other causes, too - including the other strains of Pasteurella that the vaccine wasn't developed from.
     
    promiseacres likes this.
  5. Jul 7, 2017
    DutchBunny03

    DutchBunny03 Loving the herd life

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2016
    Messages:
    612
    Likes Received:
    315
    Trophy Points:
    183
    Location:
    Northern NY
    Its awesome that some of them are better!!! Culling the ones still exhibiting the symptoms may be your best course of action.Even if they do recover, they will have much lower vitality due to their runtiness and the illness. Still keep a VERY close eye on the ones with clear discharge. Diseases can come back. Also, if possible, sterilize EVERYTHING your sick rabbits used. Feeders, watering equipment, cages, grooming tools, even wash the clothes you wore while taking care of them. And keep them in quarentine until the disease is COMPLETELY cleared up.
     
    TAH likes this.