Time to make Cheese

Hens and Roos

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I cover everything. :D
Are you kidding with the doors be opened and closed and all the in/out no way would I want a fly on my hanging cheese or whey etc.

:lol:, my house will be on the quiet side for the next few days- DD and DS(13) are heading to State Youth 4-H Conf. so only DS(10) is left with me....

Is it okay to use a double boiler through out the cheese making process- even on the 1st step of warming up the milk?
 
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Southern by choice

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Maurine's new job managing the farmers market has led to a boom in our cheese sales. We can't fill all of the orders at this point.
We are on "back order" like Hoeggers.

I am having a hard time understanding the law side of this for selling non-aged cheese....
can you post or pm me the info?

We keep being asked about our cheese and I am not selling it because I am uncertain about the law regarding the sales. :hu
 

OneFineAcre

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I am having a hard time understanding the law side of this for selling non-aged cheese....
can you post or pm me the info?

We keep being asked about our cheese and I am not selling it because I am uncertain about the law regarding the sales. :hu

This is all that I know about it. :thumbsup

North Carolina General Statutes 130A-279 - Sale or dispensing of milk
North Carolina General Statutes > Chapter 130A > Article 8 > § 130A-279 - Sale or dispensing of milk
Only milk that is Grade "A" pasteurized milk may be sold or dispensed directly to consumers for human consumption. Raw milk and raw milk products shall be sold or dispensed only to a permitted milk hauler or to a processing facility at which the processing of milk is permitted, graded, or regulated by a local, State, or federal agency. The Commission may adopt rules to provide exceptions for dispensing raw milk and raw milk products for nonhuman consumption. Any raw milk or raw milk product dispensed as animal feed shall include on its label the statement "NOT FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION" in letters at least one-half inch in height. Any raw milk or raw milk product dispensed as animal feed shall also include on its label the statement "IT IS NOT LEGAL TO SELL RAW MILK FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION IN NORTH CAROLINA." "Sale" or "sold" shall mean any transaction that involves the transfer or dispensing of milk and milk products or the right to acquire milk and milk products through barter or contractual arrangement or in exchange for any other form of compensation including, but not limited to, the sale of shares or interest in a cow, goat, or other lactating animal or herd. (1983, c. 891, s. 2; 2004-195, s. 6.2; 2008-88, s. 2.)
 

Southern by choice

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Thanks.

I have this from http://www.ncagr.gov/fooddrug/food/homebiz.htm

... cheese is considered "high-risk" which falls into a NON-home based
All high-risk products must be produced in a non-home based commercial facility . These include, but are not limited to:

  • Refrigerated or frozen products
  • Low-acid canned foods
  • Dairy products
  • Seafood products
  • Bottled water
Low-risk packaged foods are the only products allowed to be produced at home. These can include:

  • Baked goods
  • Jams and jellies
  • Candies
  • Dried mixes
  • Spices
  • Some sauces and liquids
  • Pickles and acidified foods
But then I read cheese can be made at home but must be inspected must have separate sinks may not have ANY animals in the home.

Talk about confusing... geesh.
:th:th:th
 

OneFineAcre

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Thanks.

I have this from http://www.ncagr.gov/fooddrug/food/homebiz.htm

... cheese is considered "high-risk" which falls into a NON-home based
All high-risk products must be produced in a non-home based commercial facility . These include, but are not limited to:

  • Refrigerated or frozen products
  • Low-acid canned foods
  • Dairy products
  • Seafood products
  • Bottled water
Low-risk packaged foods are the only products allowed to be produced at home. These can include:

  • Baked goods
  • Jams and jellies
  • Candies
  • Dried mixes
  • Spices
  • Some sauces and liquids
  • Pickles and acidified foods
But then I read cheese can be made at home but must be inspected must have separate sinks may not have ANY animals in the home.

Talk about confusing... geesh.
:th:th:th

I think this would apply if it is sold for human consumption.
Not if sold as animal feed.
 

Southern by choice

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I can see it now...
Garlic and Chive Chevre for your dog! :lol: :lol: :lol:

It is simply confusing to me... this is from Carolina farm stewards...

Manufactured Milk Products: Ice Cream, Butter & Cheese Although ice cream, butter, and cheese are derived from milk, they are not considered Grade “A” milk products as that term is legally understood. Instead, they are characterized as manufactured milk products, and are subject to different regulatory requirements. State law and regulations require facilities in which ice cream96 and cheese are made to be kept clean and in sanitary condition, with the maintenance of suitable washrooms and bathroom facilities, to prevent product contamination. These requirements extend to the appliances, utensils, and tools used to make and handle the cream, ice cream, butter, or cheese; all must be properly cleaned or sterilized.97 These requirements also apply to mobile frozen dessert units. Regulations require the use of sanitary milk piping in the mobile unit, and state that the equipment must be taken apart and thoroughly washed after each day’s use.98 The NC Department of Agriculture has the authority to inspect these operations and enforce the regulatory requirements.99 A valid inspection certificate is required, and it is illegal to operate without one.100 The Department is authorized to order the facility to close in the event of violations.101 An inspection certificate is also required to manufacture cheese for retail sale. The inspections are intended to ensure that the facility in which the cheese is made is clean and sanitary and safe for human consumption.102 Clean and sanitary means that the facility and equipment are thoroughly cleaned after each use and that facility conditions protect the product from contamination. Safe for human consumption means that the product is not adulterated with any chemical, physical, or biological substance that is deleterious to health. The state has adopted by reference federal rules for cheese.103 These federal rules set forth the definition and standard of identity for many different types of cheeses. The rules also require proper labeling of all cheeses offered for sale, including a list of each ingredient in the product, in accordance with general labeling requirements discussed above.


I guess we will stick to putting it in the freezer for the dry months. :\
 

OneFineAcre

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We aren't selling it at the Farmers market. It's just that when the farmers market was being planned the local newspaper did a couple of stories, one of which was a profile on Maurine. She of course mentioned our goats. As soon as that story ran, the reporter said she wanted to visit and do a story about us and the goats. It was page one on the Sunday edition. So, everyone in east wake county knows we have goats and make cheese and everyone wants some.

But, we do know a farm in Angier, we were just at their place weekend before last for our NCDGBA meeting and pot luck that does sell raw milk and cheese at the Fuquay Varina farmers market. The containers are properly labeled not for human consumption per the guidelines.

My point was, I don't think the commercial kitchen would make it legal for "human" consumption, if the milk you start with is not.

Everyone knows that allowing for the sale "for pet" consumption is a loophole to allow the sale of raw milk, without actually doing it.

I also don't think there is a lot of energy to harass people about milk and cheese, at least I haven't seen any publicity about a rash of raids on bootleg cheese operations.
 
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babsbag

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In good old over regulated CA I can't even give the cheese away without facing legal consequences. And they do raid farms on a fairly regular basis...hence the dairy...
 
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