Yearling Quote? (pic)

haviris

Loving the herd life
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
255
Reaction score
4
Points
133
If it was me the first thing I would do is get him gelded. Young horses are just not selling these days, and this time of year is also not good because it will be getting cold soon and people just don't buy as well in the winter.

If you can afford hay for them I would get him gelded and as soon as you start needing to hay them build a small temporary corral and work w/ him all winter, just the basics would be good, leading, loading, handling feet, etc. this will get him use to being handled, and use to being separated from mom. I don't expect prices to come up alot between now and spring, but alot more people will be looking and maybe you'll be able to find someone that wants a nice young project horse. Generally people want a horse that's had age appropriate training.
 

john in wa

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
110
Reaction score
0
Points
74
I know this thread is a little old but i live in Wa not to far from EBurg. have you been to the sale. people are giving horses away. i seen some nice yearlings go with no bids. i seen people just leave the horses there after the sale. last winter the price of hay killed allot of people. i used to buy big bales of alfalfa for 40 a bale just a couple years ago. last year big bales were 180+ a bale. All the hay farmers say it was high diesel prices that drove up the price of hay. we all know what really drove up the price of hay.Are good American farmers selling to Korea and china japan ect. where do you think all that hay is going in the big barns next to the free way in Ellensburg. i used to haul hay to a place in Pasco Wa and all they done was cubed it up and loaded barges going down the Columbia river to the coast and from there it went over seas. they were shipping 1000s of tons a month out. prices went down do to the amount they were buying. i seen one farmer trying to sell his hay this spring that stated in his ad that the deal with i think it was japan had fell thru and now he wanted to sell local. i seen this add on craigslist and i seen he got flagged and removed then he posted a nasty add about why he got flagged and wanted to argue with every one. it might just me but i think the real reason he wanted to sell local was his hay did not pass inspection i forget what the specs are but they only take the best hay. anyway its getting late and i need to hit the hay. good luck with the horses they are nice to look at. sorry about my spelling and punctuations
 

ducks4you

Loving the herd life
Joined
Aug 10, 2009
Messages
418
Reaction score
8
Points
153
Location
East Central Illinois
I have two ideas for you.

Call the closest Universities with an AG department and see if they'd be interested in a donation of the colt. Just like puppies and kittens, younger horses are infinitely more trainable--they might be interested. We live (near) Champaign-Urbana, where the Univerisity of Illinois is (with both an Ag dept. and VetMed.) One of the feed stores hires only students from those departments and boards horses of same. Every time a horse sneezes, ALL of them are nursing it!

Contact any horse rescues that are relatively close. The people who volunteer there will recognize the value of breaking in your colt, and will lavish attention and time on him.

If you can KEEP the mare, you can start training immediately. Don't worry about inexperience as a rider/trainer. Look online for quick help--
http://www.kenmcnabb.com/
I used to teach equitation--western pl., english pl., hunt seat, jumping, military--I really like his advice. He suggests classical horsemanship techniques, plus he understands their herd instinct and applies kindness and intelligence. (I ought to be his speech-writer for THAT accolade!!)
There's a story about an international Jumper (horse) whose rider would smack him in the mouth with the bit each time he went over a jump. The horse loved him so much that he performed for his rider despite the punishment. Horses can be like that. This mare is gonna love you because you'll be feeding her and she'll associate feeling better and better with YOU. She will benefit from being handled and you'll have a good time with her, too. THE ONLY mistake you can make with this mare is to NOT feed her (you realize this) and NOT work with her.

Good luck--hope this helps! :D

Almost forgot--IF you need any help in training or need some suggestions of good horse-training books, write me. I can suggest a few that will help.
 

trix42

Exploring the pasture
Joined
Dec 21, 2009
Messages
22
Reaction score
0
Points
22
It really depends on your area, check out craigslist.ca or equine.com or one of the sale sites and check out what similar animals are selling for.

Personally, I would put him up for $150 with an inspection of the property as a must. Make sure the people can support him.

Anything you can do to keep him from the sales barn is a good move, imo.


Cute lil guy, btw. :)
 

Nicki

Exploring the pasture
Joined
Dec 9, 2009
Messages
35
Reaction score
0
Points
22
Hi,

I am also in washington and pretty regulary check craiglist every week there are tons of great horses broke ready to go with no health problems for free. The current market here is horrible I know the horses going to the local auction even registered young stock they are lucky to get 10 dollars a head if they can even get them to sell. To get a young horse sold you really have to find that person that just falls in love with them. If you want to just find him a good home try posting online to offer him for free and require a application process, home visits, and some sort of a clause if they decide to not keep him he goes back to you for the first year or two this just prevents someone from picking him up and driving straight to the sale.

I have a 5 year old with 60 days professional training he is a large really nice looking colt we have been debating back and forth to keep him or not we just dont have the time we used to and he is really one of those horses that needs something to do but Iknow in this market even with 1200 dollars in training this year I would be lucky to get a few hundred dollars for him. Even many of the breeders are leaving mares open as babies are just not selling like they used to.

Nicki
 

Horsiezz

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Oct 11, 2009
Messages
149
Reaction score
0
Points
74
Location
Northeast Ohio
I would say $500. Start training him to load on trailers,be halter broke,etc. People love paints,and for that price(pretty good) he should go to a good home. IDK if you could still register him though...?? But there is a lot of people who do not care about that stuff.
 
Top