A look at herds / living post disaster (What are your thoughts?)

autumnprairie

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elevan said:
Symphony said:
Even better we could have a group of compounds. Brownsheep, Elevan, Autumnpraire and My group and some other members. Trading amongst each other and eating those tasty Elevan inventions.:D
That definitely sounds like a good plan.
X2
 

BHOBCFarms

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This is what I would try to have, livestock-wise:

Poultry:
Gamehens: For incubation, and raising other breeds.
For meat, any good dual purpose breed like: Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Rocks, etc. (Although I have a type of chicken I am developing that is very dual purpose and hardy, so for me, personally I will probably use it in case of emergency.
Turkeys: I like Black Spanish, Midget Whites, Jersey Giants - No need to keep a lot of breeders around, but I have had one hen hatch and raise 17 poults. Good foragers and they can fly.

Rabbits: New Zealands or Standard Rex

Goats: Nigerian Dwarfs

Sheep: Here's where I differ, I like fiber and I like mutton, and the breed I have now (Mini Cheviot) is an old type, eats little, twins, worth keeping around if I can.

Pork: Pot Belly or Guinea Hog

Cattle: I live in the desert, so I think something like a longhorn/range cattle would be good for beef production. Possibly Herefords. If I wanted Dairy, I would go with a Milking Shorthorn or Jersey or Min Jersey if I could get them.

We have an orchard, vineyard, I am looking into raising mealworms for my chickens. We want to put in a well, but not on this, but a future property elsewhere.
 

Azriel

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I think a good group of people to trade with would be important, some people are better at growing a garden others at raising animals. A root celler would be handy as well as a good smoke house. I already do alot of my cooking on my wood stove in the winter, but haven't tried baking in it yet. A knowledge of canning and drying food or a good book on how to is a must. People in the southern states would have a much easier time than ones in the north.
I would have to have a few chickens, but they would have to be able to survive the winter with scraps and digging in the barn for leftovers from the feed given to the milk animal. I don't know if you could put up a lot of hay, so most of the larger animals would have to be able to winter out on their own. I would want a couple of horses, a few cows, maybe a few rabbits. It would be nice if a neighbor had some animals you didn't to trade meat for milk or garden produce. I could do without cats but think they would be around anyway. I would have to have a dog. We have deer, elk, antelope, wild turkey, jack rabbits and several types of small game birds so hunting/trapping would be a must also.
Horse drawn equipment, buckboard, mower, rake, plow.
I don't think one person would be able to do it on their own for long, so a larger family unit would be a plus to share labor.
My BF and I have talked about this alot, and he would move to my place with his 5 adult kids and their familys. I have plenty of room and the land needed to raise what we would need.
 

Baymule

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This is a good thread. I live in town on a small lot. I keep hens in the backyard for eggs and the occasional old hen in the stew pot. I do not have room to raise feed for them. They get garden trimmings and scraps, but that would not be sustainable. I raise a garden and it gives us lots of vegetables. The climate is mild enough that I can raise cabbage, greens, lettuce, carrots, broccoli and cauliflower in the winter. These things would help, but would not totally sustain us.
 

greybeard

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Forget meats, vegetables, fruits, milk, and other "staples" . People will, one way or another figure those things out in the long run.
As in "the old days", people with highly tradeable items like tobacco, flour, sugar, salt, honey, and coffee will be looked upon as no less than gawds.
Especially true in the basic elemental needs for us as a species to survive. Salt, is one of those things that neither humans or livestock can do without for very long.
Citrus, will become like gold.
If it's a long lived catastrophic event, the ability to even clothe one's self will be paramount. Tanning of animal hides, spinning, sewing, loom making will take the place of high tech trades.
Lots to consider.
 
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