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Butchering ages

Discussion in 'Everything Else Sheep' started by mystang89, Aug 28, 2018.

  1. Sep 4, 2018
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    That, is a website from the UK and written by UK journalists FOR UK consumers.
    They've been raising and eating lamb a 'few' more centuries than their North American counterparts and no doubt taste and view things a bit different than the upstart rebel [former] colonists to the West.

    It depends where one lives I suppose and what (if any) the 'official' classification is. Some countries are much less stringent on what is called lamb and what is not.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamb_and_mutton#Classifications_and_nomenclature
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
  2. Sep 4, 2018
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    That, according to my former spouse (from Wales) would be young lamb.

    Spring Lamb would be 3-4 or 5 months at slaughter.
     
  3. Sep 4, 2018
    BreanneRN

    BreanneRN Ridin' The Range

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    I butchered 2 in July. They were both uncut yearlings, one Blackbelly, born February about 100 lbs, 1 Painted Desert/Suffolk cross weighed about 180 lbs, born end of April. I am eating them now and cooking them like I would store bought meat and they are very good. The little blackbelly might be slightly tougher, but it is hard to say. I love the loinchops, but the stew/kebab meat is also good, and like the lamburger, too. Glad they are tasty, since I will be eating them for a while... I haven't tried the roasts yet. Turned the lamburger into salad the other day. I call it hamburger salad, but since made with lamburger, it is lamburger salad. 1/2 lb of lamburger cooked with red onions, not too well done over romaine lettuce, onions, tomatoes, cheese if you like it on your hamburger, avocado slices, with thousand island dressing or bleu cheese, depending on your preference...
     
  4. Sep 4, 2018
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Herd Master

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    Lamburger salad sounds good!
     
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  5. Sep 4, 2018
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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    That sounds really delish! Look forward to trying something similar after I pick up my lamb mid month. :drool
     
  6. Sep 5, 2018
    Sheepshape

    Sheepshape True BYH Addict

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    Hi,greybeard, I'm also 'from the Valleys' and in this neck of very rural mid-Wales, these are Spring Lamb, whereas the later ones are Fat Lambs or Prime Lambs. Those lambs which are still not very heavy by September(ish) become Store Lambs but I've never heard the term Young Lamb. I'm not sure if there's an difference in the taste of various types of lamb as I don't eat anything with a face apart from sunflowers, but what I am sure of is that some of the 'lamb' sold is definitely mutton (though my carnivorous friends tell me mutton has a much better flavour).
     
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  7. Sep 8, 2018
    Jennifer Hinkle

    Jennifer Hinkle Loving the herd life

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    I have never tried lamb, have always wondered what it tastes like. I raise hair sheep. But have yet to try it.
     
  8. Sep 8, 2018
    Mike CHS

    Mike CHS Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    @Jennifer Hinkle I know quite a few people that raise them but have never eaten any. Our butcher raises hair sheep and has been in business for 25 years and they had never tried any until I cooked some and took it to them while I was dropping another off for processing. They just recently slaughtered one of ours for their own use.
     
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  9. Sep 8, 2018
    Jennifer Hinkle

    Jennifer Hinkle Loving the herd life

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    One day I will.
     
  10. Sep 8, 2018
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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    Lamb is delicious! I'll be picking mine up next weekend! :weee:drool
     
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