Changing goals and speed

Mike CHS

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Those daily chores somehow sometime don't allow for a whole lot else to get done. You have been knocking it out and in my opinion, doing great getting there.
 

AClark

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I'm not used to humidity at all. The heat doesn't bother me, I can deal with 100+ degrees no problem after living in AZ and TX, but with the humidity I think it's a lot worse.
I didn't even start on the goat pen yesterday. I went and got feed and unloaded it and all that. I tried really hard to make fewer trips, if I could only manage to get a second sack up on my shoulder it would be faster, but I can't lift a 50 lb bag with 1 arm. I'm sure I can carry 100 lbs, but I can't get the bag far enough over my shoulder to balance - I tried, but it slid off.
I did work and ride DH's horse, and he rode him bareback, and so did my 6 year old. He's too much horse for a little kid though so I led him around with her on him.

Father's Day is this weekend...glad someone mentioned it on Facebook. I got DH a new bosal and headstall for his horse.
I hope he likes it, I think it's pretty, and not girly.
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@greybeard Had a question for you. I'm looking to trade for cow/cattle of the beef variety. Budget is around $1200 for the trade item. What would be a fair trade both ways? A cow calf pair, bred cow, calves? I'm not breed particular, just want to make sure a trade is fair.
 
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AClark

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We are a practical bunch when it comes to gift giving. We buy each other things we know will be used and loved for years to come. Sometimes it's hard to pick out things like that, but when it's something someone needs and will appreciate, it's all the better. I also never mind getting tack as a gift, I might have a tack hoarding problem :) Oh, new splint boots, why thank you! :)

My boys and I finished the new goat digs yesterday. I think I could have used a bucket loader to pound those T-posts in the ground was so hard. Not to mention trying to dig in those 4x4's...with a shovel. The first 6 inches of ground were a nightmare, all rocky and hard clay. I had my oldest stand in front of the shovel, then I stood on it and rocked it back and forth to wedge it down and pry it up. I think that took us the longest.
We had fun, I let my oldest boy drive my truck (I wasn't in it, he scares me too much, lol) through the gate and around the pasture to bring all the panels and tools and crap. He did well, he's learning not to mash the "go" pedal. He did a lot of the post pounding, I let him wear my gloves because, let's face it, my hands are like leather already, and he has blisters today, but he worked hard and didn't give up.
DH got home in time to help me finish hanging the latches, so while the pens probably aren't perfect or anything, they are pretty decent. I was thoroughly amused watching DH's fat gelding look disappointed in not being able to eat the goats feed last night! Usually, he'll scarf his down and go take theirs. They aren't staying in there yet, as I have to finish their shelters and obtain waterers still, but they went in long enough to eat un-molested.
I think it took us around 4 hours start to finish. Even had the baby outside with us laying on a blanket in the shade. My younger son was on "baby detail" because he doesn't weigh enough to help dig and isn't big enough to pound posts yet - my girls stayed in the house and wanted nothing to do with the manual labor.

Ended up riding my horse after dinner and she did well. I put some effort into grooming her other than just knocking the dirt off, and she really loves to be brushed and combed. She gets better every time, less spooky and panicked. I've decided I'm going to have to shoe her, as her feet are ouchy when ridden. I think I'm going to go with the glue on re-useables.
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Bruce

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Cuteness baby pic!!

I've found that a spading fork is better than a shovel to get a hole started.

You gotta get those girls out to help on ALL types of jobs or they'll end up like mine. :( Good on your boys though. Your younger one was on baby watch? Bet the girls could have helped there even if they didn't touch anything that was dirty or manual labor. Like my 2, seeing you working your @55 off doesn't translate to "I should get off my butt".
 

AClark

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Oh I put the girls to work too, they were tasked with cleaning inside since they didn't want to go out and help with the fence. They did a nice job of picking up. We all clean the house and had tidied up that morning, but I tasked them with wiping off kitchen counters, sweeping the kitchen, and cleaning their bathroom.
My older daughter isn't really safe around the baby, she gets distracted too easily and the baby is really too heavy for her to hold. My 6 year old is better, she sits down with the baby and doesn't try to carry her. Actually, the boys are better with the baby than the girls are, more gentle.

It's funny how kids personalities are. My 6 year old daughter is a little Tom boy, she is usually good with getting dirty. It was hot outside yesterday, in the high 90's, but wasn't bad where we were in the shade. My 8 year old daughter is Miss Priss. Kind of like one is going to be a rodeo queen, and the other is going to be more like Mom. I don't know where the Miss Priss comes from, I'm not like that at all obviously. My boys are kind of the same way, the 10 year old is rough and tumble, completely fearless like his 6 year old sister, my oldest is more nervous and afraid to fail and do things.
 

greybeard

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My boys and I finished the new goat digs yesterday. I think I could have used a bucket loader to pound those T-posts in the ground was so hard. Not to mention trying to dig in those 4x4's...with a shovel. The first 6 inches of ground were a nightmare, all rocky and hard clay. I had my oldest stand in front of the shovel, then I stood on it and rocked it back and forth to wedge it down and pry it up. I think that took us the longest.

no posthole diggers?
I probably have 4 pairs, not counting the twist type hand augers, the extra tall lineman hole diggers, and tractor driven ones.
You need to put a value on your time...initial cost divided by the time they last. $50÷5 years=$10 year=a big time saver. They'll dig right thru that clay and able you to pull out most rocks too. Implements are an investment that you will get a visible and tangible return on.
 

Mike CHS

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Something that helps us is to use a rock bar to break up the soil/gravel and then use the post hole digger to take the dirt out.
 
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