Coccidia :(

Britgoes2market

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Did you ever find/get California Reds??
No I went with the Tunis :D

There is a gal maybe 3 hours from me that sells the California reds and she is super sweet! I also have a little California red currently who inspired me moving to either the red, or the Tunis....
This red girl....I can't say enough good things about her. When we brought in the Tunis lambs, she made sure they were welcome, when I called all my girls to the barn for the night and the new girls wouldn't come in, she would sit at the gate and call them off the pasture, she was by their side when they were getting sick....I'm sad she is one of the sick ones too, but thankfully she is isn't as bad as this one Tunis girl. But I love them all!
 

SageHill

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No I went with the Tunis :D

There is a gal maybe 3 hours from me that sells the California reds and she is super sweet! I also have a little California red currently who inspired me moving to either the red, or the Tunis....
This red girl....I can't say enough good things about her. When we brought in the Tunis lambs, she made sure they were welcome, when I called all my girls to the barn for the night and the new girls wouldn't come in, she would sit at the gate and call them off the pasture, she was by their side when they were getting sick....I'm sad she is one of the sick ones too, but thankfully she is isn't as bad as this one Tunis girl. But I love them all!
You’re lucky to have them. They all sound wonderful and the little Red sounds like the descriptions I read of their temperament. 😊
 

purplequeenvt

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Coccidia is always in the environment. Lambs are more susceptible and most healthy adults won’t have any issues with it. It’s species specific also so your poultry won’t get it from the sheep and the sheep won’t get it from the birds, etc.

Management is your best defense. Sheep that are eating their feed off the ground will have a lot more exposure. Hay gets put in feeders off the ground that they can’t put their feet in. I also feed grain with a coccidiastat.

I prefer to treat with sulfadimethoxine, but you need to get it from a vet and it’s easier to get Corid. Some people say Corid doesn’t work for them anymore, but I don’t have to treat very often so it still works for me.

Keep in mind that coccidia can permanently damage a lambs gut. They may not grow as well or keep weight on as easily.
 

Mini Horses

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I keep sulfer tabs on hand (SMZs)...fish dept, same as. Yep, valley vet, no RX. Also amoxicillin. 😊

Also toltrazuril...buy online but very pricey. Can use preventative, I dozed per month for 3 months, or as cure when detected.
 

farmerjan

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I have heard for years about the different things, like coccidia, being species specific.... HOWEVER.... we put calves in a section of the barn about 4 years after raising turkeys there... they were kept in for a couple weeks until fully feathered (got them as young poults not baby poults... no heat lamps) and then they were allowed to free range.
Calves got sick, coccidia... treated, got better, got sick again... TURNS OUT that coccidia are NOT necessarily species specific... had them cultured... yes, it was diagnosed as coming from the dry bedding that had some turkey manure probably still in it...slightly different strain of coccidia they said..... pens get cleaned out but not bleached or anything extreme.... exposure to previous bugs helps to build immune systems... Had had cattle with access to this pen, after the turkeys were gone, so didn't give it any thought when I wanted to pen it off for some calves; but this was something the vet had never seen before... I kept telling them it was from the poultry and they said impossible. I have since heard that it has happened to others who had poultry running free range amongst their calves....
For the most part certain things are MOSTLY species specific... but do not discount the possibility of some being able to breach that "barrier"....
Yes, they are in the environment, yes ground fed can make them more likely to pick up spores... and as @purplequeenvt said, young animals are much more susceptible to things like that until their bodies build up immunity and tolerance. One of the reasons you.... seldom.... see blackleg in older cows... but calves in the 250-600 lb range can get it and die in 48 hours under certain circumstances... colostrum induced antibodies last for 6-12 weeks in calves, then they go through that susceptible period while their immune system is maturing... given the right conditions, they can pick it up and overnight they are sick and die. One reason we try to hit them with blackleg at the 4-10 week range, and also try to hit the cows with blackleg when preg checking every year or 2.... to keep immune levels higher so their colostrum has good anti-body properties.
 

Britgoes2market

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I have heard for years about the different things, like coccidia, being species specific.... HOWEVER.... we put calves in a section of the barn about 4 years after raising turkeys there... they were kept in for a couple weeks until fully feathered (got them as young poults not baby poults... no heat lamps) and then they were allowed to free range.
Calves got sick, coccidia... treated, got better, got sick again... TURNS OUT that coccidia are NOT necessarily species specific... had them cultured... yes, it was diagnosed as coming from the dry bedding that had some turkey manure probably still in it...slightly different strain of coccidia they said..... pens get cleaned out but not bleached or anything extreme.... exposure to previous bugs helps to build immune systems... Had had cattle with access to this pen, after the turkeys were gone, so didn't give it any thought when I wanted to pen it off for some calves; but this was something the vet had never seen before... I kept telling them it was from the poultry and they said impossible. I have since heard that it has happened to others who had poultry running free range amongst their calves....
For the most part certain things are MOSTLY species specific... but do not discount the possibility of some being able to breach that "barrier"....
Yes, they are in the environment, yes ground fed can make them more likely to pick up spores... and as @purplequeenvt said, young animals are much more susceptible to things like that until their bodies build up immunity and tolerance. One of the reasons you.... seldom.... see blackleg in older cows... but calves in the 250-600 lb range can get it and die in 48 hours under certain circumstances... colostrum induced antibodies last for 6-12 weeks in calves, then they go through that susceptible period while their immune system is maturing... given the right conditions, they can pick it up and overnight they are sick and die. One reason we try to hit them with blackleg at the 4-10 week range, and also try to hit the cows with blackleg when preg checking every year or 2.... to keep immune levels higher so their colostrum has good anti-body properties.
I am fairly certain mine got sick because my chickens and turkeys free ranged our property, would seek out our barn to eat the creep feed offered to the lambs, and crap all over their food. Since my lambs got sick, the chickens can't free roam until I can figure out how to keep them out of the barn.
 

Baymule

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I wonder if you could treat the chickens, but that would mean a withdrawal for the eggs. And chickens peck the dirt, so would be reinfecting themselves…. Guess that wouldn’t work. Just thinking with my fingers!
 

Britgoes2market

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I wonder if you could treat the chickens, but that would mean a withdrawal for the eggs. And chickens peck the dirt, so would be reinfecting themselves…. Guess that wouldn’t work. Just thinking with my fingers!
They are actually currently in their no egg production days, so I might have to think seriously about this!! I might head over to the feed store to see what they offer for chickens and give it a go. Thanks for the thoughts!
 

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