De-Horned 2yr old Doe-WEEK 3 update

Southern by choice

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No not easy but after she sharpened them into spears- well that made it easier.

I do hope those that read this thread realize that this is a rare case. Most goats with horns never pose a problem. There are goats that are polled and goats that are dsibudded that can be just as much of a knucklehead... just not as dangerous.
 

Womwotai

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I think you said today is the day….hope it all goes well - update us when you get a chance.
 

Womwotai

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Glad to hear all went well. I think go ahead and post - this is, after all, a place to learn. If you post a disclaimer that they are graphic in the subject line and again in the post before posting the pics, people who don't want to see them don't need to open the thread.
 

Baymule

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What a brilliant little witch! You do have to admire her for being smart enough to actually sharpen her horns. But at the same time, you can't tolerate an animal that is a danger to others. Post the pictures. Anybody that can't stomach the reality that is animal husbandry doesn't have to look. It's not all pink noses, warm and fuzzies.
 

hilarie

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Bravo, Southern. Those horns are sabers and you're absolutely right to be proactive. Is it hard? Of course. But this is why it's animal stewardship, not just farming. It's keeping *everyone's* best interest in mind and taking the lesser of the two evils - having the procedure that will literally save her (and others') lives. I'm sending up metta for you and Millie, and I hope it's going OK now - I guess it's done and would love to know how it went. And BTW, I know exactly what you mean about wanting to be in the thick of it, how it gives you more control over your response (and maybe over the outcome). Some things you just need to bear witness to. If you're a reader, read "The White Bone." And email me (hilariejones@yahoo.com) if you need Adaptic, or vet wrap, or any other thing.
 

hilarie

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I'm for posting. Ditto what everyone else said: we're in animal husbandry and midwifery (is that a great play on words, or what?;) ), not in table etiquette. Bring it, with a disclaimer, and let the heebie-jeebies fall where they belong: on those who choose to look.
 

Southern by choice

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Sorry this has taken so long to post...

First PLEASE let me say this REALLY was a very difficult decision and I hope those reading are able to separate the horn debate from this topic. I have no problems with any of our horned goats and this IMO was absolutely necessary for the safety of my family as well as all the other animals. Some may say if the goat is that mean put her in the freezer.
Well she is a very sweet goat with humans and with other animals she "likes". At 2 years of age and a great producer as well as a very loved goat I could not see that as an option until others had been exhausted. I couldn't see shortening her life by 10 years because of pain she might endure for a day or two. BTW she has needed no pain meds. She had one (shot) before we left the vets and that's it.

Looking back Millie really started this about a month after her first kidding. She was a bit of a queen and sometimes a bully but never tried to hurt anything before that.

After going through this with her a friend asked "if you could go back after now having done this would you make the same decision?". I can honestly say ABSOLUTELY. So far Millie hasn't skipped a beat. She is still a lovable brat, a little ornery, still bossy, and a pig to boot! She came home and was trying to get the lids off the feed bins for food. 1 hour after all this! :rolleyes:
She acts as if though nothing has happened.
I would not do this for cosmetics reasons but for real necessity only. I will say I have heard many horror stories and IMO this was not a horror story. I have assisted in far many other surgeries/procedures that I thought were much worse.

I will not go into great detail but I did do the holding ( along with my farming partner "Straw", as some of you know him as) during the procedure. Not an easy task. She was sedated- but not to the point of being completely knocked out, just heavily sedated and she was given 4 injections in the brow for nerve block. The hold must be precise and a small bit of resistance is better than trying to hold a limp noodle 100+ lb goat with it's head perfectly still as the sawing is much more difficult. The angle of the tilt must be very precise. Until I prepped her (shaving and cleaning) I never noticed just how bulged out a goats eyes are from their head. WOW! So the tilt must be precise so as you saw you do not keep going with the momentum and cut into the eyes.

BTW- each horn took approximately 15-20 SECONDS to saw off. The cauterizing a few seconds each.
The bandaging took longer than the whole procedure.

First this is Millie hanging out Sunday..
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This is the reason she was so dangerous- sharpening her horns...
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I got as many pics as I could but was kinda busy...
This is after the first horn. The first horn was easier as you could help do the hold by holding the other horn. There were only a few drops of blood that kinda rose up and those bleeders were cauterized. The blood in the horn is there because it dripped into it. It is not filled at all.
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Close up... because the color is so vivid it makes it look like the cavity is filled, it is not... like a cut that dripped down and coated the inside.
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I am holding her in a rest position. We waited a few minutes before moving to the other horn. One down. See what I mean about those eyes!
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Second one done. AGAIN there was no spewing blood. More like qwicking a dogs nail but not even that bad. Look at those eyes.
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Another view

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Just got home sedatives pretty much worn off. Millie did her I love you- that is where she presses her head up against you .:)
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All bandaged- She looks like she has the Mumps. We are showing her her horns.
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She walked over to to other goats. They were scared... mommy it's frankengoat... some were brave and stood their hair up then ran away. LOL
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Inside of horns
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Another view- they were only hollow up to 3" inside.
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So far Millie has not missed a beat and she even opened the daggone gate and ran up to the house. She is Millie- no worse for wear. She even butted the turkey. Yep... Millie is fine.

NOW- having said that I really never want to have to do that again, BUT I would if the situation ever called for it. Odd how she started all this after she freshened. Wonder if some kind of hormonal issue?

I wanted to share this because being in with my goat and going through the whole process allows me to share with others that may be at a place of last resort and have heard how awful it is. Yes it is awful but so was getting my wisdom teeth pulled. Yes the sinus cavity is open but it is bandaged and it is cold- less possibility of fly strike.

I also kissed my girl between steps and told her I loved her and it would be over soon. I know I did the right thing for Millie.

Hope this helps others. :)

I will be posting in another thread about sneaky Millie....
 
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