Emergency - Goat labor

Hens and Roos

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I have 2 that are due soon and this will be my first time and I am really worried that I might not get things right. I had the vet out about a month ago for a check and when I mentioned them coming if I needed help, she automatically mentioned doing a c-section without trying to reposition so this makes me more apprehensive as I don't want to just go to that option if the kids can be repositioned. I use to rescue deer and I had one that would come up to her shelter and deliver and she never had any problems that I had to help with other than staying with her Thanks for your response, I wish you would post more, boy how I wish you were close to me. Thanks a Bunch.
Do you have cement blocks that they can stand on? I've noticed that our does will stand on them with their front feet to help get the kids into position. Good luck with your kiddings!
 

Georgia Girl

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@Georgia Girl maybe I will start a thread, others that have also had to reposition could chime in.
There are some key things I think are really important. Tips and hints that also may help.
The tough part is I am limited on time and there are so many things I would love to share... just a time issue.
But I'll try.
In the meantime look at what is considered "normal presentation".
Good news is most goats do everything fine without an issue.
What breed of goats do you have? Do you think they are having more than twins?
I have Saanens and I don't know if twins or more, one is pretty large, vet did ultasound on 3-7 but could not tell me how many. I intentionally bred them to a pretty mini=Nubian in hopes the kids would not be large.
 

Ridgetop

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I have 2 that are due soon and this will be my first time and I am really worried that I might not get things right. I had the vet out about a month ago for a check and when I mentioned them coming if I needed help, she automatically mentioned doing a c-section without trying to reposition so this makes me more apprehensive as I don't want to just go to that option if the kids can be repositioned. I use to rescue deer and I had one that would come up to her shelter and deliver and she never had any problems that I had to help with other than staying with her Thanks for your response, I wish you would post more, boy how I wish you were close to me. Thanks a Bunch.
If your vet wants to do a C-section without even waiting to see if the goat can deliver, find another vet. Repositioning kids is not hard (3 or 4 are more difficult, but doable). You just to have to get inside, sort out the body parts and pull them out. I played a game with my 4-H project kids where we put a bunch of stuffed animals in a pillow case so it was stuffed and the kids had to identify what they were feeling.

When I go inside a doe or ewe to reposition and sort out babies, I always feel like that scene in Men in Black when the hero gets swallowed by the giant cockroach alien! Just as slimy, but necessary. Go slow, and ease in with lots of antiseptic soap or special birthing lube if you have it. Make sure you feel any legs or body portions all the way up to the body so you know what they are and that they belong to the same baby.

I always close my eyes so I can let my hands tell my mind what part I am feeling when I go inside. Mu project kids used to call me to help if their animals had trouble. (My neighbor even had me come pull her colt.) One time I went to help pull kids from a doe that was in trouble. One was stillborn and she still had a kid inside - I could feel the head and bones when I picked up her belly. I told the family that the other kid might be dead too, but I would pull it to save the doe I greased up with antiseptic soap, closed my eyes and went inside the doe. She was terribly tight which was odd, it felt like the cervix had already closed up. If the kid was dead for some time, maybe the doe's body was telling her everything was over, but I had felt a kid inside when I palpated so I kept trying to find it. Nothing, but tightness. As the familyheld their breaths in worry, I opened my eyes and realized I was inside the rectum!!! OOPS!!! :hide :lol: I quickly pulled my hand out, scrubbed off, resoaped and this time found, repositioned, and pulled a live kid from the correct opening. It just shows that even the most experienced can make mistakes. That is one of the jokes I love telling on myself! :gig

Southern: If you want to do posting about repositioning and pulling kids and lambs, let me know and I will contribute.
 

Southern by choice

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I have Saanens and I don't know if twins or more, one is pretty large, vet did ultasound on 3-7 but could not tell me how many. I intentionally bred them to a pretty mini=Nubian in hopes the kids would not be large.
That could backfire on you... that tends to produce more kids by using smaller bucks (genetic wise)

Have you been able to look at pics of normal presentations?
 

Ridgetop

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The best thing to do is to photocopy pix of kidding presentations, put them in plastic sleeves, and leave them in the kidding box with your supplies. Even though you memorize the instructions, in the demands of kidding and trying to pull a stuck kid from a bawling doe, your mind goes blank! During our first time pulling kids, I had my child hold the book up so I could look at the pix and decide which way the kid was coming. I was terrified she would drop it in the slime and birthing goo! :fl
 

Georgia Girl

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If your vet wants to do a C-section without even waiting to see if the goat can deliver, find another vet. Repositioning kids is not hard (3 or 4 are more difficult, but doable). You just to have to get inside, sort out the body parts and pull them out. I played a game with my 4-H project kids where we put a bunch of stuffed animals in a pillow case so it was stuffed and the kids had to identify what they were feeling.

When I go inside a doe or ewe to reposition and sort out babies, I always feel like that scene in Men in Black when the hero gets swallowed by the giant cockroach alien! Just as slimy, but necessary. Go slow, and ease in with lots of antiseptic soap or special birthing lube if you have it. Make sure you feel any legs or body portions all the way up to the body so you know what they are and that they belong to the same baby.

I always close my eyes so I can let my hands tell my mind what part I am feeling when I go inside. Mu project kids used to call me to help if their animals had trouble. (My neighbor even had me come pull her colt.) One time I went to help pull kids from a doe that was in trouble. One was stillborn and she still had a kid inside - I could feel the head and bones when I picked up her belly. I told the family that the other kid might be dead too, but I would pull it to save the doe I greased up with antiseptic soap, closed my eyes and went inside the doe. She was terribly tight which was odd, it felt like the cervix had already closed up. If the kid was dead for some time, maybe the doe's body was telling her everything was over, but I had felt a kid inside when I palpated so I kept trying to find it. Nothing, but tightness. As the familyheld their breaths in worry, I opened my eyes and realized I was inside the rectum!!! OOPS!!! :hide :lol: I quickly pulled my hand out, scrubbed off, resoaped and this time found, repositioned, and pulled a live kid from the correct opening. It just shows that even the most experienced can make mistakes. That is one of the jokes I love telling on myself! :gig

Southern: If you want to do posting about repositioning and pulling kids and lambs, let me know and I will contribute.
 

Georgia Girl

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I am just amazed at how knowledgeable you are and thanks so much, I would love to know more on repostioning but I don't know enough about that to start a thread, other than just ask a question. thanks again
 

Georgia Girl

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That could backfire on you... that tends to produce more kids by using smaller bucks (genetic wise)

Have you been able to look at pics of normal presentations?
Oh OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO MY, Now you have me really worried, I never thought of that.
I have looked at and copied pictures of normal and abnormal presentations that I have posted in my goat barn .
 
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Ridgetop

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Triplets and quads sometimes results in a mixup and traffic jam at the exit! You might have to reposition them, but that is easy as long as you can sort out the different limbs and know which kid they belong to. If you just get the kid into position, the doe will deliver. Repositioning multiples is not hard, over size singles are what scare me. You will have to pull them. However, Saanens are one if the largest breeds. Nubians are well known for producing 3 and 4 kids, but Saanens usually just have twins. Don't worry, but definitely breed to a Saanen buck next time. There is no need to breed to a tiny buck thinking it will result in smaller kids. The kids will grow to the size there is room for in the mother.

Everything should work out fine. A C-section is the last hope. Don't wait to go inside the doe and check the kid's position if she is pushing. If there is no kid, and she stops pushing, go in and check. Often does that cannot give birth due to a stuck or malpresented kid will stop their labor. I may be too quick to check and pull, but I hate waiting and having dead kids.
 

Mini Horses

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I have Saanens and I don't know if twins or more, one is pretty large, vet did ultasound on 3-7 but could not tell me how many. I intentionally bred them to a pretty mini=Nubian in hopes the kids would not be large.
I have Saanen & Saanen X Nubian. Most often mine have twins, occasional single. One doe has decided trips would be fun, so 2 yrs in a row now. But, see toes & nose...then they slide on out. Fortunate that mine have delivered nicely. As to multiples, the doe drops the eggs, so multiples are dependent on HER. Having had (& still have 2) mini Nubians, I can attest that they did have trips more -- the Nigie genetics at work. In fact 2 of them never had other than trips.

Currently I keep fullblood Nubian and Saanen bucks. Thinking to add a few Boer does & a buck to the farm. Used to raise them. When/if I do, the Boer will be used on the big does I keep, as they can handle the bulkier kids and feed them well! The Boer will be for meats and the crossed kids bloom larger/faster, for sales. It's just as @ Ridgetop, has said, for meat use & sales...go with a meat type. I can have a Boer 6 month old weigh more than a yr old dairy kid. Plus better meat texture for table.

Think dairy cow -- beef cow. Same with goats.
 
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