Making A Pasture

Bruce

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Seems to have stood the test of time so far, though.
Those thick walls likely keep the interior temperature pretty stable. I wouldn't mind a bunch of pictures of the house.
hint hint :D

BTW, my lawn rarely looks that good. Even after I mow it the dandelions, old and new, thumb their noses at me.
 

Sheepshape

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There is native stone here, a reddish iron ore rock that makes interesting structures, but is seldom used anymore.
Thank you for your kind comments. There's a lot of local stone which has been used around here, but it's used less and less. Pity that your native stone isn't used much, now, even if it were only in reclamation projects.

I wouldn't mind a bunch of pictures of the house.
hint hint :D
Today house.jpg


Here's the front' of the house, which is actually the 'back'. The drive leads up to the other side of the house where the stones are rougher and not hewn into such regular shapes (don't know why, but it's common around here)
 

Bruce

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Here's the front' of the house, which is actually the 'back'. The drive leads up to the other side of the house where the stones are rougher and not hewn into such regular shapes (don't know why, but it's common around here)
:love
I didn't know that solar panels were common in the early 1800's ;) Really nice looking and both old and modern at the same time.

The reason for the front/rear discrepancy might be similar to how houses were sided in some areas here. Shingles on the front/street side (expensive, show off to the community) and lap siding in the rear. Probably the more "finished" stones were more expensive since more work was needed to chisel them down.
 

Sheepshape

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I didn't know that solar panels were common in the early 1800's
:thumbsup With our climate, I sometimes wonder at the wisdom.....but, yes, they do generate a lot more electricity than we use, and this then gets paid for by the National Grid.

The reason for the front/rear discrepancy might be similar to how houses were sided in some areas here. Shingles on the front/street side (expensive, show off to the community) and lap siding in the rear. Probably the more "finished" stones were more expensive since more work was needed to chisel them down.
You'r absolutely right. Same thing happened over here. However, the nearest house is almost a half a mile away 9and built in the 1990's), so it's really not clear as to why this pattern was followed.The 'back' of the house is much rougher stone.

How are you all doing for rain right now? We've had a very large amount this year so far. Last year was (uncharacteristically) dry and hot over here, so the grass shrivelled and browned. This year is just the opposite, grass growth is lush and rapid, with temperatures a good 20 F cooler than at this time last year.

How's everbody's 'little patch of green (brown/grey)' doing?
 

Baymule

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My patch of green is growing! I can hardly contain my excitement as it grows. It is maybe an inch tall now. It is not a solid green, kinda patchy, that’s what you get when you hand sow. It will put out runners and fill in all the gaps. By end of summer it should be a pasture!
 

Bruce

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Current panels are much better than those of the past. We had cloudy all day yesterday with a fair bit of rain but my array still managed to generate 9.5 kWh. This time of year they are tilted at 17° so nearly horizontal and even though there was no light directly focused on them all the reflection in the clouds is collected except during the heavier rain periods so I'm not surprised yours produce well even though it is apparently cloudy frequently.

We were really dry last summer, hoping not to see that again.
 

CntryBoy777

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I know how ya feel Bay....that's how I was about the rye grass, clover, and winter peas I used to sow....it is a good feeling seeing the results of your hard work....even when ya see the "frog hairs" starting to blend into patches of green, then one day ya go out and just can't believe it grew so fast.....:)
 
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