Meet Pearl, New Horse

Southern by choice

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:clapI am so happy for you!

I think I am even happier for her! I know she will have the best place and best person to care for her. :hugs


I share this little blurb for you and @Wehner Homestead
Before we got goats the girls wanted a pony.
My sister had horses and we knew the crazy expense.
My DH was like NO, no pony!
I said your girls are little once and every little girl wants a pony. You will be their HERO! Forever!
After awhile it clearly was not something we could do here. And very expensive.
He mentioned getting goats.
We got goats. :D

Moral of this story... If he'd a just gotten that pony....

:lol: I am sure one pony would have worked out far less then the bajillion goats we have and all that goes with it!
 

robhuncor

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Even scrawny she is beautiful now so when she fills out it will be amazing! In my 30 years in the horse business, I've seen some horrible cases of neglect and it takes a lot of patience. It can be quite complicated and time consuming to get them back to health but each case is different and it is very rewarding in the end. I think the process is good for the humans helping as well as the horse! It forges a bond and gives you a sense of accomplishment like no other.
 

Baymule

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She whickered at me this evening when I took her pellets to her. She was pacing the fence, wanting her pellets. I was happy that she felt good enough to pace the fence and happy that she now recognizes that I bring her feed. She did behave well when I poured her pellets in the tub, no crowding or ears pinned back.

I forgot to give her more hay and had already taken off my farm shoes and sat down. DH still had his boots on, so he went out there to give her hay for the night. Pearl came to the fence and he patted her and hugged her neck.

Pearl got a small watermelon from the garden today. She ate most of it and enjoyed it.

I checked her for sand in her gut this morning. The way you do that is to take several fresh horse poop balls and put them in a jar. Add water and shake. Let it settle. If there is sand in the bottom, the horse has sand in their intestinal tract and needs help. There is a horse product called Sand Clear which is Psyllium husk. It pushes the sand out and cleans up the gut. I looked carefully at the jar this evening and there was no sand in the bottom.

this is Pearl yesterday, she already looks a little better.
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Baymule

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What a transformation for the chestnut gelding! So shiny and plump! From the pictures of Pearl, she's very thin but, interestingly, her feet don't look bad for a neglected horse.
Can you take a close look of the bump on Pearl's back, about where the back of the saddle would be? I tried looking it up and found something called "hunter's back" and that a bump like that can be caused by an ill fitting saddle, which would be the more likely conclusion. Do you have any knowledge or experience about that? Most of what I was reading said that their horse had no pain from it. I have pressed down with my hands and she doesn't react.
 
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