Beekissed

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What a MIG? Sorry
Managed Intensive Grazing, CC. It helps you get more bang for your buck on small acreage and helps you do it more economically than other types of farming. It requires more hands on farming~moving the stock more frequently~ but also requires less input from outside resources such as feed, hay, fertilizer, seed, barns, tractors, etc. to improve the soils and grazing potential.

Greg Judy on YT breaks it all down and shows extensive teaching and results on his channel.
 

Crealcritter

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I do know about trees from logging and sawmilling. I've drunk from the firehouse of forestry management many times. I am pretty handy at cloning and growing trees.

I kind of want to keep animals to a minimum honestly, and to just enough substantial meat for my wife and I at first and that may be the long term plan also IDK yet.

Our first attempt to get the farm making us some income will be trees. Mainly landscaping trees, so a small little nursery persay to start. Also I do want to plant a row of walnuts since they are a double income tree, nuts and lumber after they mature. First will be "instant shade trees" though that are native to the area like red maples, beech, birch, red and white oak. And also some ornamentals like Japanese maple, magnolia, redbud, dogwood, mimosa, pear, apple, etc...

My wife and I also will of course garden and most likey set up a Roadside stand for fresh fruit, berries, veggies and the like. We also want to do a small little vineyard of table grapes. row of asparagus, garlic, blackberries, elderberries, blueberries, etc... That we'll most likely also include in the roadside stand.

Basically I do pretty well with plants, but know very little about hooves. But I have 15 acres to play with, it's not like we don't have enough acreage for all of this. It just takes knowlege, planning, investment and ambition.
 

Crealcritter

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I also wanted to add there's a pretty good article here on trees.

 

Crealcritter

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This ground in the green rectangle is extremely well established pasture. I absolutely hated to bushhog it but it was two year growth and had olive trees starting to take root. When I say extremely well established I mean the grass was as tall as my tractor very little weeds at all. The whole time hogging I could help but think of all the animals it could feed. So I think this piece of land would be best suited for grazing animals. At the point of the guitar pick shaped pond, you can see it's overflow drainage for the pond. I'm thinking I could berm that up with a pipe and run it down to watering trough inside the green area. As for shade, there are a couple of nice areas for animals to get shade already. But there is no real shelter for them. So I reckon I'll have to build something for them.
Screenshot_20201018-211426_3~2.png


This area in blue is where I think I'm going to set up my sawmill. It has egress from the one lane road on the north side and is plenty big enough for a semi to pull into an turn around if needed. Plus there is shade from the trees on both the north side of the pond and west side along the fence row.
Screenshot_20201018-211426_3~3.png


This area I red is where we plan to have our gardens, grapes and berries.
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This area in orange is where we plan on having an orchard. It needs a dozer since it used to be an old hog lot long ago. The mini pond is actually a hog wallow and it's deep, like 10' deep. I would like to keep it as a mini pond for watering the orchard when needed, but doze the rest flat.
Screenshot_20201018-211426_3~5.png


Finally I guess the rest will be the nursery.
 

Baymule

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Could you put a box blade on your tractor and level off the hog pen?

A 3 sided shed is usually sufficient for animal shelter. Place it where it is accessible from different pastures. Include a “lot” space at the shed for containment. Put water in the lot and you don’t have to place water all over the place.

You also want to put the shelter, lot and loading chute where it is accessible by truck and trailer.

Gates. Lots of gates. When you think you have enough gates, get some more.
 

farmerjan

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And don't put in anything less than 16 ft openings....1 - 16 ft gate or 2 - 8ft gates.... but getting in and out with any type of machinery is an easier task if the gate is wide enough. Our discbine for mowing hay is 13 ft..... most haybines are at least 9-12 ft..... there is nothing worse than having to hit the gates at the exact angle to get through them.... BELIEVE ME, there are 2 that I cuss every time I have to go through them as the length of the rake and the angle makes a 14 ft gate a NIGHTMARE at 2 places.... If you want a smaller gate for like getting a "lawn mower" or tractor and cart or just walking through that's fine.... but make sure that the gate that any equipment can go through is 16 ft.... you really will be glad you did.
 

Crealcritter

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What do you think of my crazy idea to pipe water from the east side of the barn plus the 4 stalls into the pond. And from the pond to a watering trough that would be acceptable from both pastures? I believe I could get it done with 6" PVC.

Screenshot_20201018-211426_3~7.png


East side of the barn is a lot of roof which is a lot of water. That's 48' x 40' or 1920 SQFT of roof and rain water that would otherwise just fall on the ground. I know I could berm up the pond at least another 4' and probably be able to keep it full. But on a plus side my deer stand is just about complete. I'll just sit on the barn roof :) always have to have a "Plan B"
IMG_20201017_134008841.jpg
 

Baymule

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How many acres is the green lined area?

The piping the pond water could work, but is the water clean? Some ponds are good water, some are muddy, some get alge and scum in them.
 

Crealcritter

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How many acres is the green lined area?

The piping the pond water could work, but is the water clean? Some ponds are good water, some are muddy, some get alge and scum in them.
It's pretty clean. Fish and turtles live in it, my hunting dog would rather drink from it than the tap water I put in his bowl and I didn't see any alge this summer. I would like to also put in a airrator which would really clean it up. Again plan B as long as I got a trench open from the barn roof to the pond, bury some electrical conduit and run 10-2 w gnd at the same time to power an airrator. And maybe a small pump for recirculation and or filling the watering trough during dry spells.

Best I can figure 10 acres. You can see in this photo how the property was fenced into four 5 acre sections. The previous owner changed that into a strange configuration after FS came.

I'll get better pictures tomorrow,
Instead of airials, for you. It's rained for two days so yeah pretty muddy right now.
Screenshot_20201018-211426_3 (1).png
 
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