Crealcritter

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Ok here is some better pictures of the 10 acres that I would like to split into two pastures for hooves. I'm standing at the point of the guitar pick shaped pond, which is where it drains when it overflows. As you can see it's not to far to trench a pipe and gravity will do the work for me.

This is landscape mode on the camera looking north east.
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Same but looking south east. You can see the electric fence row better in this picture.
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Also I would like to note... On the east side of the pond is a dozer berm to keep water in the pond. It's steep and I didn't feel comfortable hogging it. But that's OK because it has a lot of blackberries growing in it, which my wife wants me to keep. So win/win :)
IMG_20201021_130345884.jpg


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Crealcritter

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Any thoughts/comments on my crazy watering idea?
In a nutshell... Pipe rain water run off from the east side of the barn into the pond (gravity fed). Berm up the low side of the pond. Include a pipe in the berm with shut off valve. Pipe pond water (gravity fed) to a watering through thats accessable from both split pastures (2 5 acre pastures).

I mean in order to put hooves on the 10 acres they need a source of water, am I right?
 
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farmerjan

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I see nothing wrong with your ideas. Salvaging water and run into the pond means less mud right below the roofline. Not like you are depriving water to grass or anything. If it will run gravity then what's not to like. Except for some "muscle" to do the piping, I don't see any real negatives to it. It might not be realistic for the winter if you have alot of cold and freezing.... but you can try it and see. If you were having to spend a fortune in money and not time, then it might be something you would want a more proven guarantee that it would work. But again, I see nothing essentially wrong with the idea.
 

Crealcritter

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Took the CFO (wife) on a drive about the property in the farm truck. We now have a 3 year plan to close off the 10 acres and split it in 1/2 with a small pole barn for animal shelter.

Year 1 and 2 will include haying the 10 acres for winter animal feed and a new fencing plan to utilize 1/2 of the stalls on the east side of the barn for animal shelter, along with a large sections of existing fencing and some new fencing for a large single pasture. Also we are going to try my crazy watering idea but move the watering trough in-between the stall roof and the pond, temporarily. I'll still berm up the pond overflow drainage with a pipe and valve but we won't trench a pipe down to the 10 acres yet.

My son and future daughter in-law came and helped finish putting a lid on the 4 stalls on the east side of the barn. So that's done \o/ I'm so glad to have a lid on those stalls. Since we used recycled tin, I have to treat it with muriatic acid, caulk all the holes and then paint it. I think I'll just paint it silver. But my deer stand for 25 of my friends is now done :)
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My future daughter-in-law was so interested about my AC D19. so I showed her how to operate the old girl and she drove it around a little bit, smiling all the way. I do believe she could be a farm-girl very easily. I love having her out here. She is always full questions and everytime she shows me something new. Today she pointed out a persimmon tree growing up around the pond, that I surely would have cut down this winter for sure. But now I'll save it.
IMG_20201023_125516964~3.jpg
 
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Baymule

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Never clear trees out in the winter-you don't know what you are cutting down. Case in point-we once bought 16 acres, DH cut, chopped, cleared and burned his way to happiness all winter. Spring came. No dogwoods. No blooms. DH was upset, "WHY are there no dogwoods???" Duh, dummy, you cut them ALL down!
 

Crealcritter

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Looking at temporary t-post fencing options, any experience or thoughts on LockJawz?


 

farmerjan

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I like the idea of the hay ground. One thing that we do. Cut off first cutting, then you can take electric and divide up the hay ground for later pasture instead of cutting again....extend your grazing season, let the animals work for you... not you always working for the animals. The hay that we just got done making...the 2 "top fields" that I was talking about... used to be cut off for first cutting. Then it was allowed to grow. When we moved the cattle in to the adjoining pasture after hunting season, for winter grazing.... we kept the 2 hay fields fenced off until they had worked on the pasture pretty hard. Then we would let them in the top fields... and the hay from the very top field we had set along the edges of the field, on all the ledge and rocks.... and they could self feed on the hay once the grazing in that hay field got down. Saved us alot of "hay feeding" by having that 2nd growth "hay" not made into hay but available for grazing. With little snow cover, they could get a fair amount of grazing until mid - Feb..... then we would lock them out before any chance of soft muddy ground that they would tear up the grass.... and fed hay in the lower pasture part. Cows would get moved out in June, calves weaned off, and the hay made up there in the hay fields, then allowed to grow.... and the pasture could grow for the summer until we moved the cattle back after Thanksgiving.
If you only have the 3 animals, divide up the 5 acres into 2 lots, and rotate them back and forth..... about 3 weeks or more at a time.... using the grass as a guide. They will actually get more grazing out of it because they will not be eating their favorite grass down to the roots and leaving the rest to get tall and stemmy. They will eat more of it overall, then when they go into the next side, it will all be at a more "vegetative" state.... in other words, it will all be more tender to eat. Sometimes we will go through and bush hog a pasture if they have not gotten it all eaten down enough, to knock down the more mature... and tougher.... growth.
 

Crealcritter

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Thinking on my crazy rain water idea a little more. How big (gallons) do you reckon I need for 6 lambs, 3 cows and a few goats. To start off with? I was thinking it would probably be just as easy and perhaps less expensive (because I'm cheap, I work for love and food) as it would be to try and buy something and then mess around with trying to fit pipe in whatever I would buy.
 

Beekissed

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Thinking on my crazy rain water idea a little more. How big (gallons) do you reckon I need for 6 lambs, 3 cows and a few goats. To start off with? I was thinking it would probably be just as easy and perhaps less expensive (because I'm cheap, I work for love and food) as it would be to try and buy something and then mess around with trying to fit pipe in whatever I would buy.
You have a pond, right? Why not use that water source for your watering needs?

Start with this guy....he's got some great ideas on watering and he breaks it down for you quite nicely:






https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDHMRxNyV_g
 
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