Please tell me about Coyotes

goatgurl

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Coyotes seem to be very opportunistic. They will kill what ever is available, the easier the better. I had one come into my yard and try to kill my 20 pound dog, my screaming and hollering freaked him out enough that he dropped the little guy. Mostly small and young or old and frail are at risk. I have had livestock guardian dogs for the past 15 years, first Anatolian Shepherds and now Maremmas and have not lost a kid, or lamb or chicken to a coyote since they have been on duty. The neighbor to my left lost several calves last year and they aren't sure if it was coyotes or mountain lions but my critters have been safe from harm.
 

goatboy1973

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Coyotes will eat darn near everything be it alive or dead (usually doesn't matter how long it's been dead). They will go through trash, they will kill guardian dogs, llamas, donkeys, goats, calves, chickens... I have even heard of coyotes killing a raccoon who was in the act of killing chickens so they got white and dark meat. LOL! Coyotes also will eat grub worms and root through the ground eating plant material like a hog if times are really tough and despite what others may say being opportunistic, coyotes will attack people mainly young children. Opportunistic critters constantly are weighing cost vs. reward. In other words, is this meal that I'm wanting going to be worth the cost. The coyote will usually take the most nutritious food source that is the easiest to obtain i.e. They won't kill a big healthy cow if there's a dead one close by because they risk getting seriously hurt or killed trying to kill a 1200lb. cow and will expend a lot less energy to get the same meal without getting hurt.
 

greybeard

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I live on Long Island where coyotes have been unheard of till the past couple of years. There have been several sightings. I have no experience with coyotes and how to keep my animals safe from them. Please tell me how to keep them out and what else to expect. Thank you!
If L.I. coyotes are like ours, you can expect one of 2 outcomes.
1. You will hear and or see them but never have a problem with them.
2. You will hear them and see them and see the carnage they cause.
It depends on the natural food chain available to them. If there is plenty of wild game (rabbits, ground nesting birds, raccoons, and deer fawns) they will leave livestock alone. If the natural food chain is decreased or if the coyote pack #s increase beyond what nature will feed, then you start having trouble with them. Most years, I tend to leave them alone but Once it starts, it won't stop. Buy bullets--lots and lots and lots of bullets.
 

bcnewe2

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We had a horrible time with coyotes down in AR. 2 lgd's, a pyr and pyr cross did the trick. Here in MO I've heard a few, not seen a one and hope it stays that way.
I have 1 lgd, an Anatolian that has done wonders for our fox issues. If we start having coyote issues I will add another dog.
Donks are great, dogs in my opinion are better and Llama's are all show and no go! To be fair though my guard llama helped the 2 lgd's down in AR. He would lead them to a safe place while the dogs dispensed the threat(s). I had a few large alpaca's last fall, they did a pretty good job of keeping me alert for any stray dogs. They would call out and lunge at the intruding dogs. But would have been toast for coyotes.
 

bonbean01

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Too many people in our area are losing sheep and goats to coyotes this spring...more than usual. Many are now getting LGD and we are thinking about getting one too. Our home base for the sheep has good fencing wire, hotwires around the outside of the fencing, very bright light, motion lights and is near to the back of the house...where we keep a loaded gun and lots and lots of bullets and a hand held spotlight. No losses yet, but know it is a matter of time. Not sure why so many more livestock losses this spring as there are so many deer here too???
 

greybeard

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Too many people in our area are losing sheep and goats to coyotes this spring...more than usual. Many are now getting LGD and we are thinking about getting one too. Our home base for the sheep has good fencing wire, hotwires around the outside of the fencing, very bright light, motion lights and is near to the back of the house...where we keep a loaded gun and lots and lots of bullets and a hand held spotlight. No losses yet, but know it is a matter of time. Not sure why so many more livestock losses this spring as there are so many deer here too???
I think maybe the longer winter has something to do with the increase in #s.

When times get bad for humans, we tend to cut back in what we can afford to feed, whether that be livestock, pets, or even the number of children we plan on having. Nature has a very different way of dealing with harsh conditions and a threat to it's future. A wildlife biologist explained to me that every species, both plant and animal go into reproductive overdrive, making one last stab at continuing it's line. In 2011, we had a drought for the recordbook here. Everything was dying, including old mature oaks, 100' pines, even nuisance plants like yaupon and holly but when fall finally got here, there were humongous crops of pine cones, oak acorns, holly berries and yaupon berries. I have never seen so many acorns on the ground in my life. It's the same with animals in the wild in long winter cycles. They breed like crazy, somehow increasing litter sizes, trying to increase the numbers of live births. The more that are born, the better likelihood that at least one will survive. Afte this last long winter, I have seen more fawns, newborn feral pigs, cottontails and jack rabbits this spring than any time in recent memory. Seen 3 different sets of twin fawns and that has been a rarity here. I suspect the same is true for the coyote community. Their response to adversity is simply to increase their #s, in an effort to continue their lineage.
 

goatgurl

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so true, we also have an abundance of wildlife around. have seen twin fawns, a mama black bear with 3 cubs, bobcats with 3 to 5 kits, a shapaful of wild pigs and more "song dogs" than i care to count. i made a pact with the wild critters around here, i won't bother them if they don't bother me and mine. that and a couple of lgd's seems to be working. everything in this world is just trying to get by. one of the neighbor boys was telling me about a lady rancher further into Oklahoma that had wild pigs chase her lgd up on her back porch and killed the dog. say's she is afraid to go out to take care of her goats. he, his brother and a couple of friends are going to stay at her place and hunt pigs for a couple of weeks. at least for the most part coyotes will back off and leave.
 

goatboy1973

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so true, we also have an abundance of wildlife around. have seen twin fawns, a mama black bear with 3 cubs, bobcats with 3 to 5 kits, a shapaful of wild pigs and more "song dogs" than i care to count. i made a pact with the wild critters around here, i won't bother them if they don't bother me and mine. that and a couple of lgd's seems to be working. everything in this world is just trying to get by. one of the neighbor boys was telling me about a lady rancher further into Oklahoma that had wild pigs chase her lgd up on her back porch and killed the dog. say's she is afraid to go out to take care of her goats. he, his brother and a couple of friends are going to stay at her place and hunt pigs for a couple of weeks. at least for the most part coyotes will back off and leave.
This reminds me of the tv show "American Hoggers".
 

Lenny&Squiggy

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Living in the city limits, I don't think we have too many coyotes, but they have been spotted in our neighborhood in the past. We have a heavily wooded back yard and do back up to a creek. So of course - I'm worried. Was looking at various options for protecting our two baby NDs, and one that seemed easy enough was installing motion sensor lights. The pic was taken before it was completely dark. Do you think this is helpful in any way? Or will the coyotes laugh when they see it? (I've read that Wile E. was a little more stupid than most coyotes!)

 

OneFineAcre

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Living in the city limits, I don't think we have too many coyotes, but they have been spotted in our neighborhood in the past. We have a heavily wooded back yard and do back up to a creek. So of course - I'm worried. Was looking at various options for protecting our two baby NDs, and one that seemed easy enough was installing motion sensor lights. The pic was taken before it was completely dark. Do you think this is helpful in any way? Or will the coyotes laugh when they see it? (I've read that Wile E. was a little more stupid than most coyotes!)

If I understand correctly, the pen in your picture is inside a larger fenced in area. Make sure that is secure. So, you have two fences they would have to get through. I think that's good.

Motion detector lights might be better on the perimeter fence?

You could also run some hot wire around your pen.

But, really you are probably OK.
 
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