bethh Life on the Funny Farm

Baymule

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I'm just not there. I'd eat them but not so sure about the processing. Hubby is flat out, NO WAY! I'd pay someone to do it for me but can't seem to find anyone.

Oh, you'll get there. The first one will be the hardest, after that, it gets easier. We use a killing cone, made of rolled up duct taped cardboard. LOL LOL You can make your own redneck contraption or buy a proper stainless steel one.

A killing cone, IMO is the most humane way to kill a chicken. Upside down, head sticking out and a very sharp knife to cut the throat. Don't cut the head off. Cut the throat, the brain will tell the heart to keep pumping, thus bleeding out the carcass. The bird is unconscious in seconds. It may "kick" as it bleeds out, that can be disconcerting the first few times, just hold the legs so it doesn't kick it's way out of the cone.

Take the bird out of the cone, wash well with water hose to remove any dirt. Cut off the head. Dip in scalding hot water, then pick feathers. I start with the wing feathers because they are the hardest to pull out. Sometimes I use needle nosed pliers.

Lay plucked bird on it's back, at the end of the breast bone, make a cut into the body cavity. Cut carefully down towards the anus, cut around it and then pull out the guts. Cut off the neck, careful not to nick the crop and spill out any feed. It is best to withhold feed the day/night before. Remove the crop and trachea. Cut off feet, disjointing where the feathers end the the scaly legs begin. Take in the house, wash, wash, fine pick the pin feathers.

Bag and freeze. You now have a meal for your family and they DURN SURE BETTER ENJOY IT!

It's not rocket science, you can do this. Just make up your mind and go for it.
 

bethh

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Oh, you'll get there. The first one will be the hardest, after that, it gets easier. We use a killing cone, made of rolled up duct taped cardboard. LOL LOL You can make your own redneck contraption or buy a proper stainless steel one.

A killing cone, IMO is the most humane way to kill a chicken. Upside down, head sticking out and a very sharp knife to cut the throat. Don't cut the head off. Cut the throat, the brain will tell the heart to keep pumping, thus bleeding out the carcass. The bird is unconscious in seconds. It may "kick" as it bleeds out, that can be disconcerting the first few times, just hold the legs so it doesn't kick it's way out of the cone.

Take the bird out of the cone, wash well with water hose to remove any dirt. Cut off the head. Dip in scalding hot water, then pick feathers. I start with the wing feathers because they are the hardest to pull out. Sometimes I use needle nosed pliers.

Lay plucked bird on it's back, at the end of the breast bone, make a cut into the body cavity. Cut carefully down towards the anus, cut around it and then pull out the guts. Cut off the neck, careful not to nick the crop and spill out any feed. It is best to withhold feed the day/night before. Remove the crop and trachea. Cut off feet, disjointing where the feathers end the the scaly legs begin. Take in the house, wash, wash, fine pick the pin feathers.

Bag and freeze. You now have a meal for your family and they DURN SURE BETTER ENJOY IT!

It's not rocket science, you can do this. Just make up your mind and go for it.
Thanks Bay for the instructions!! I know I will eventually get my nerve up to do it.
 

bethh

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Wow, I can’t believe I’ve not been on here. We’ve been busy with the bathroom renovation now complete. I’ve had our grandkids almost daily since the pandemic began. I’m not sure which is harder homeschooling the second grader or chasing the youngest who just turned 3. My mother in law came up unexpectantly on thanksgiving and has been with us since then.
The goats are doing well. Once the weather improves, we will get the bloodwork done making sure everyone is pregnant and healthy. Our chickens are doing well. He have various ages of Silkies I have Ameraucana eggs in the incubator to hatch in 2 weeks.
 

bethh

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Miss @bethh,

Happy New Year! Good to have you back on the forum. Yes, please post pictures of your chickens (and goats and dogs and grandkids and ...).

Senile Texas Aggie
Last 3 Silkies I’m selling until I can sex them.
D955A9B1-3D2F-4465-80A1-90B24899A327.jpeg
20CD0671-DD71-4DFF-A5EB-7806B5BA372A.jpeg
 

bethh

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Life gets busy sometimes, glad you checked in with us!
It’s unbelievable how busy. I feel like I jump from one thing to the next. The second grader was supposed to go back to school this month. The county decided to go back digitally so he’s still here doing school. At times it’s frustrating because the programs don’t work correctly. I feel bad for him. It makes everything take longer.
 

bethh

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Hey everyone, last week I talked about how busy its been. Well, I should have kept my big mouth shut. We went for a friendly hike yesterday with our daughter and family with their Boot Camp family. It was nice being out in the fresh air but the trail was very rocky and lots of protruding roots. I wondered how someone would get out if they were to fall. The entire time I was focused on the ground because I didn't want to trip. Well, I tripped alright and broke my ankle. I was lucky to be with the group I was. I attempted to hop with support from my husband and son in law. That wasn't happening. 3 people carried me out. I felt like Cleopatra except for the throbbing ankle.

Now back at home, I can't do the stairs thankfully we live in a ranch. Stairs are avoided by me not going to the basement. Also means, I can't currently help with the animals--stairs and mud plus its non weight bearing. I have to schedule an appointment with the specialist which has to wait until tomorrow since they are closed today.

I have 20 eggs in the incubator, in the basement, due to hatch Sunday. We gave the Silkie broody 6 eggs. Poor hubby has to monitor the nest to make sure no one else lays there. The goats need yearly bloodwork and to check for pregnancy. Its gonna be crazy around here now.
 

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