Best dog that protects animals and kids?

Ridgetop

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Due to Covid there has been a run on shelters for dog adoptions. Some indiscriminate people are producing puppies for sell to meet this market. It is predicted that a lot of these dogs will be back in the shelters as soon as everyone goes back to work. Very sad.

The person who has a waiting list for her puppies is a better bet than rushing to buy the first one you can find. It gives you time to check out her reputation, check with previous buyers of her puppies about them, and make sure she has done the appropriate testing on her breeding male and female. Go see the parents, if she has puppies from previous litters, ask if you can see them or talk to other owners. This dog will be a commitment for the next 14 years, not only of love but money in the cost of upkeep, vet care health, etc. Don't rush into a quick decision just because you want a Puppy NOW. If she has a waiting list for her puppies, ask if she has repeat buyers. If so you have found a winner. Referrals and recommendations are excellent.

Goldens are renowned for easy training, good temperaments, and great with ki
ds IF YOU BUY FROM A GOOD BREEDER WHO TESTS THEOR BREEDING DOGS FOR GENETIC PROBLEMS, HIPS AND ELBOWS. There are too many Goldens out there now suffering from poor temperament, bad hips, etc. to take a chance. People buy a female and then decide to make some "quick and easy" money by breeding and selling puppies. They don't test. Maybe their dog was fine but the male was not or down the line genetic problems pop up. Now you have a bunch of dogs that have problems and other people are breeding for that "easy" money from puppies too. The breed suffers and so do the buyers of all those dogs. The main problem with goldens is the long hair that sheds everywhere. Fleas also like long haired dogs.

Australian shepherds have less prey drive, less herding instinct although can be trained, good with kids and protective. Very easy to train. Like collies they can develop eye problems from inturned eyelids which require testing in the parents to verify. Again, long hair that sheds. Everywhere.

Labradors are a good breed. They are retrievers rather than pointers. Easy to train. Short haired. Good with kids.

Rottweilers are not known for being good with livestock. They can also be very dominant and harder to train.

Unusual breeds are not a good option since they are usually more expensive being considered a "rare" breed. Also not as much is known about them and their proclivities.

Border Collies need to work. If you don't have the work for them they will find it - high energy and will herd your goats relentlessly from one end of the property to the other just to have work to do. LOL This has happened.

Akbash is a livestock guardian breed. You need a good fence.

Collies are beautiful but need massive daily grooming for that huge coat.

Remember that early obedience training is the key to a successful dog experience. Allowing the dog to run on several acres without oversight is asking for trouble. Electric wire fencing (invisible fencing) is not secure without training the dog to stay away from the barrier. Once the dog learns that it can go through the barrier with just a few moments of discomfort, it will go. Especially if they want to go after something. If you are out on the acreage with the dog you can call back a trained dog. If not, you can't.

When I suggested fencing in your yard, I meant fencing in a yard space that would allow the dog to access the house but be contained inside a fenced area adjacent to the house. A kennel run (wire dog cage) is fine for certain times and reasons. We have a 10' x 30' chain link kennel run for our dogs that we use when strangers are working on the property. That is all it is used for. Our 6 acres are fenced with welded oil pipe and no climb woven wire. It is very steep and in areas the hillside has sloughed down against the fence making the original 5' perimeter fence 3' high in areas. We attached T posts to the uprights with hose clamps and added wire to make the fencing higher around the property. The dogs had never gone over that 3' height, but if coyotes or a cougar was there they might go to defend the sheep. When we give a party and don't want the dogs helping themselves to the food LOL they go in the barn which has a 42" gate. They have been trained to stay in there. I fence to protect my dogs from humans.

Training is key. Just because you have 3 acres doesn't mean that your dog will be safe running over the acreage. It can get in trouble on its own.

Good luck!
 

goatyyymama164

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Due to Covid there has been a run on shelters for dog adoptions. Some indiscriminate people are producing puppies for sell to meet this market. It is predicted that a lot of these dogs will be back in the shelters as soon as everyone goes back to work. Very sad.

The person who has a waiting list for her puppies is a better bet than rushing to buy the first one you can find. It gives you time to check out her reputation, check with previous buyers of her puppies about them, and make sure she has done the appropriate testing on her breeding male and female. Go see the parents, if she has puppies from previous litters, ask if you can see them or talk to other owners. This dog will be a commitment for the next 14 years, not only of love but money in the cost of upkeep, vet care health, etc. Don't rush into a quick decision just because you want a Puppy NOW. If she has a waiting list for her puppies, ask if she has repeat buyers. If so you have found a winner. Referrals and recommendations are excellent.

Goldens are renowned for easy training, good temperaments, and great with ki
ds IF YOU BUY FROM A GOOD BREEDER WHO TESTS THEOR BREEDING DOGS FOR GENETIC PROBLEMS, HIPS AND ELBOWS. There are too many Goldens out there now suffering from poor temperament, bad hips, etc. to take a chance. People buy a female and then decide to make some "quick and easy" money by breeding and selling puppies. They don't test. Maybe their dog was fine but the male was not or down the line genetic problems pop up. Now you have a bunch of dogs that have problems and other people are breeding for that "easy" money from puppies too. The breed suffers and so do the buyers of all those dogs. The main problem with goldens is the long hair that sheds everywhere. Fleas also like long haired dogs.

Australian shepherds have less prey drive, less herding instinct although can be trained, good with kids and protective. Very easy to train. Like collies they can develop eye problems from inturned eyelids which require testing in the parents to verify. Again, long hair that sheds. Everywhere.

Labradors are a good breed. They are retrievers rather than pointers. Easy to train. Short haired. Good with kids.

Rottweilers are not known for being good with livestock. They can also be very dominant and harder to train.

Unusual breeds are not a good option since they are usually more expensive being considered a "rare" breed. Also not as much is known about them and their proclivities.

Border Collies need to work. If you don't have the work for them they will find it - high energy and will herd your goats relentlessly from one end of the property to the other just to have work to do. LOL This has happened.

Akbash is a livestock guardian breed. You need a good fence.

Collies are beautiful but need massive daily grooming for that huge coat.

Remember that early obedience training is the key to a successful dog experience. Allowing the dog to run on several acres without oversight is asking for trouble. Electric wire fencing (invisible fencing) is not secure without training the dog to stay away from the barrier. Once the dog learns that it can go through the barrier with just a few moments of discomfort, it will go. Especially if they want to go after something. If you are out on the acreage with the dog you can call back a trained dog. If not, you can't.

When I suggested fencing in your yard, I meant fencing in a yard space that would allow the dog to access the house but be contained inside a fenced area adjacent to the house. A kennel run (wire dog cage) is fine for certain times and reasons. We have a 10' x 30' chain link kennel run for our dogs that we use when strangers are working on the property. That is all it is used for. Our 6 acres are fenced with welded oil pipe and no climb woven wire. It is very steep and in areas the hillside has sloughed down against the fence making the original 5' perimeter fence 3' high in areas. We attached T posts to the uprights with hose clamps and added wire to make the fencing higher around the property. The dogs had never gone over that 3' height, but if coyotes or a cougar was there they might go to defend the sheep. When we give a party and don't want the dogs helping themselves to the food LOL they go in the barn which has a 42" gate. They have been trained to stay in there. I fence to protect my dogs from humans.

Training is key. Just because you have 3 acres doesn't mean that your dog will be safe running over the acreage. It can get in trouble on its own.

Good luck!
Thanks for all the info! I will definetly talk to my hubby and research more with him. We don't need a dog now but would like one. we will try to get a better fence for when we let the dog outside of its dog run. We will talk to our close family friend to see where they got their Golden retriever, their dog is a beautiful #10 dark red ( the color we want ) and he is such a good dog! He loves the kids and is a good guard dog. We want a dog like him.
 

Simpleterrier

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Wow every one missed the one and only dog breed that can fill the role AIREDALE.

Really golden retriever,lab I thought u said u want a dog not a thing that eats dog food and does nothing. Number one dog to be bitten by is a golden retriever.

I would stay away for any shepherd breeds, Retriever breeds.

Picks in order.
1. Airedale
2. Elk hound
3. Cur mt. Or black mouth.
4 mutt that doesn't have any kind of heeler or lgd in it or golden retriever
5. Pit/lab or boxer/lab they make great dogs.
6.airedale

Just in case u missed it I'd get an AIREDALE.

Maybe ask me again I'd probably go with an AIREDALE.

Just a reminder an AIREDALE is the way to go.
 

Beekissed

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Number one dog to be bitten by is a golden retriever.
Not according to all the studies out there.....one study puts your Airedale pretty high on the list compared to the GR. The studies are all a little different in their statistics, but goldens barely even feature on all the lists.

Labs are the number one family dog for a reason, for several years in a row....they are versatile, easy to train, loyal and courageous. There's a reason they are used as guide dogs, cadaver dogs, support dogs, assist dogs, etc. They are just that versatile and all around good dogs.

"Pit bulls were responsible for the highest percentage of reported bites across all the studies (22.5%), followed by mixed breeds (21.2%), and German shepherds (17.8%). Mixed-breed dogs and pit bulls were found to have the highest relative risk of biting, as well as the highest average damage per bite."

"According to the American Animal Hospital Association, the breeds of dog responsible for the most “damaging” bites per year, rank as follows: unknown breeds, pit bull-type breeds, mixed breeds, German Shepherds, terriers and Rottweilers."

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Here’s a list of the dog breeds known to bite the most:

 
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