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Same questions different person

Discussion in 'Everything Else Goats' started by Glenn Stanford, Feb 11, 2018.

  1. Feb 11, 2018
    Glenn Stanford

    Glenn Stanford Exploring the pasture

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    Thanks Simpleterrier, some money to some could be a lot or a little to others. What does that mean most will rip me to shreds the way I do it? Thanks
     
  2. Feb 11, 2018
    Goat Whisperer

    Goat Whisperer Herd Master

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    Often times many do not make a profit when only having a few animals. Startup costs alone can be overwhelming.

    Breed of goat and type of pasture/forage makes a difference. Many expect goats to just live off of crappy pasture and can’t understand why their animals are not healthy. Vet costs, medications, dewormers (if needed) are costly.

    Some will go for the most inexpensive animals they can get, but then get blindsided by disease, parasites, or were sold complete culls that will not you anywhere.

    Here in NC it is illegal to sell goats milk for human consumption unless you are a dairy. If you plan on selling any products you need to check your state laws.

    @Baymule gave some great advice.
    I know our sheep lived off the land. While our goats needed hay & feed throughout the entire year, the sheep maintained great condition off of pasture alone. They were not breeding animals, but they never had any health issues or parasite problems. They also do not need the same quality hay as gout dairy goats.
    But boy, they were wild!

    I have no problems with someone bringing in a little $. ;) As long as the animals are getting proper care and have proper shelter/fencing etc. However, I do not agree with breeding a doe 2x a year, every year, in an effort to bring in extra money. :hide There may be exceptions, but this is very taxing to the animal.
     
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  3. Feb 11, 2018
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master

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    Our Kikos do great off of the land but they need more wild land not pasture.

    I will say @Goat Whisperer is very dead on when she says to watch out for what you buy. Far too many take animals to the sale barn or sell animals that are problems, for cheap! These are animals that are infertile, can't birth well, can't raise their own kids, diseased...

    @Baymule :thumbsup
     
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  4. Feb 12, 2018
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses True BYH Addict

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    It does cost FAR less -- in the long run -- to raise well-bred, healthy animals. That is why we all say "start up costs" can be hard, because we buy from healthy flocks., vice culls.

    Many are happy to cover feed costs, have "own use" product, and maybe a little extra. Others have a farm business that is successful but not new, only hard earned & developed over time.

    I raise chickens, sell eggs, sell a few chicks and/or young pullets. Always have eggs to eat, chickens to butcher (especially extra roos that are hatched, grown out) and this sure reduces grocery buying. So, my chickens support themselves.

    My dairy goats are milked. I use the milk, make cheeses, soaps, and have sold a little milk to animal rehab groups. The kids that come each year for freshening are generally 100% sold. That pays for a majority of their hay/feed. Excess milk, cheese whey, helps feed chickens & pigs -- if I am currently raising a couple for freezer camp. I sell goat milk soap at a few annual festivals, a couple beauty shops, etc.

    And I raise a garden, can & freeze, sell some excess, give some away, use some to feed to all the animals. In fact, raising some excess of certain produce JUST for animals.

    All of these things require physical labor and can be sustainable but, you will not get rich! It sounds as if you may want to consider & research flocks of chickens, ducks, turkeys. They all have their own requirements for feed, fencing, shelter, care but are smaller and less taxing physically than sheep & goats weighing 1-300 pounds. Have you ever raised animals? Do you have any now? If not, there's some major learning before you buy, otherwise you just threw your $$ away.

    Another thing I read is that you are involved in raising your grandkids. So can the parents help out both financially and physically? You may need to tap into that resource to help make your farm sustainable for everyone. As others have said, you also need to have a plan & goals, which include where/how you can market your "product". Everyone replying has, or has had, so very many issues in their lives to get to where they are now and offer great input for you to consider. This will not be an overnight successful input to your bank account -- unless you sell the farm. Most of us work at "maintain & improve" with a frugal lifestyle....some are still working before/after retirement.

    I hope we have given you some things to consider that may work. Never a day we won't be here to answer questions & listen to your thoughts, offer suggestions and sound advice based on years of experience -- good and bad. LOL
     
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  5. Feb 12, 2018
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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    I greeted you on your intro post, so welcome again. I also made a couple of points over there. Hope whatever you do, that you'll stick around and let us know how you're progressing.
     
  6. Feb 12, 2018
    Glenn Stanford

    Glenn Stanford Exploring the pasture

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    Thanks everyone, Some sound and experienced advice.
    I had a few goats (pets) about 20 years ago. Started with a Nannie then bought a billy they had twins and before you know it I had 8-10 goats.

    We had two PB pigs (pets) that I thought were a lot larger than pics I saw of PB's but anyway they all were fat from pasture, scrubs and even our and one neighbors shrubs.

    The neighbors would feed them through the 5 strand barb wire fence, pet them even semi encouraged them on their property etc then got huffy and even had a order from the courts to keep them off their property.

    Well I worked two sometimes three jobs and had no time or funds to fence them in correctly. But funny that their place was the only place they bothered and fences were worse on other boundaries.

    So after the court order I broke my wife and 2 girls hearts by loading them onto a borrowed trailer and carried them to a sale about a hour away.

    We do have two bantam hens and two bantam roosters we took in from my one of those hearts I broke. She loves animals and got them at the local flea market and kept them for 2-3 years that was going on 3 years ago. I believe her husband may have forced her to get rid of them.
    We have ate the eggs some but no way would they pay for themselves they along with two guniea's stay caged up because of the dogs.
    I have the 10x10 roofed dog pen where I can move them around so they are not in their feces and have clean ground for scratching.

    I recently moved the gunieas into their own pen because it appeared they were aggravating the little hens but man they seem to really miss being in the same pen with the chickens, they are constantly squeaking and squaking and running back and forth in their pen mostly on the side that faces the old pen were the chickens are.
    I have debated about putting them back together it appears they are heartbroken but fear after 3 weeks of separation they may fight.

    I want them all out on the ground for insect control but 3 dogs and several hawks have made me leave them penned.

    Country fresh eggs don't sell very well in my area. My neighbor tried to sell theirs for quite sometime without success, even had a nice sign in their yard.

    One thing one can say about our animals is they are not in need of feeding, we make certain they have plenty even when we have little for ourselve.

    About the Grandchildren, Our oldest Grandson lives with us and has since he was born. He has some mental problems and can't make it in the world on his own, he turned 25 on the 11th. He is like a 14 year old, stays up all night, sleeps all day, everyday. He stays in his room unless he is called for supper then he fixes him a plate or something else if he don't like what we are having and returns to his room.
    He did eat with our family for his birthday supper but as soon as he finished which was before anyone else he returned to his room.

    He will help a little around here but only and I mean only what you show him to do, no more. And that one time without raising HE** to get him out of bed. It takes him two hours to dress to pick up limbs out of the yard and without supervision it's one twig at a time even if you had him use the wheelbarrow two days prior. But I love him and will do whatever it takes to support him. He will go to town with my wife sometimes to keep her from going alone. And I do appreciate that.

    Our youngest two Grandsons 2 and 5 spend 99% of their time at our house the 5 year old has autism. Our Daughter and son in law are separated and in the process of divorcing. I avoid my son in law when he comes to get them on Fridays as I saw a picture of his bottom and it was bruised from a spanking for not making it to the bathroom in time. Remember he is autistic, I know as well as I know my name that I will kill the SOB when I see him again. I am old and broke down so it won't bother me to live in the taxpayers house off the taxpayers
    Food, meds etc. But the little one loves his daddy even though the 5 year old is terrified of him. And I love both of them with all my heart and would miss the remainder of my life without them.

    He does not know my wife and I know about the whipping our Daughter took a photo of it and that started the ball rolling on the divorce. I just found out about 6 weeks after it happened my wife finally showed me.

    He had made her delete the pic in his presence but she had emailed to her secondary email in case he got her phone and deleted it.
    To his surprise it will come out in court. My Wife and I don't trust him and do not want these children in his presence unsupervised.

    Well I will shut up now or I will bore everyone's head off.
    Long story short, between maxed out credit cards, and finance company loans we are ruined. My credit score goes down every month, to the point that I can't borrow anywhere execpt the previous finance companies I already have a account with.
    They do me the favor of consolidating the old one with the new one.
    The minimum payment is all we can afford to make, there is always something else coming up or happening at all times. A lot more month than money and getting worse borrowing to make repairs on this and that.

    I am not physically able to hold a job or I would be. I am looking for a way to make some money to help out. I though about trying to use my land to make some but don't have the investment money.

    I can't lease it for pasture and make any, the going rate in this area is around $100-$200 per year but that's not worth the hassle.
    Thanks for everyone's input and help.
     
  7. Feb 12, 2018
    Glenn Stanford

    Glenn Stanford Exploring the pasture

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    How does one go about finding a market for their goats, sheep or lambs? I found a website, sheepgoatmarketing.info and according to this source there are none in AL, MS, TN I did find a couple of butcher shops within a hours drive but they are mostly beef and restaurants. Any ideas? Once again thanks.
     
  8. Feb 12, 2018
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses True BYH Addict

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    check with USDA for locations they inspect as butcher facilities in your area.

    You have a load and I wish you well with coming out of it.

    Unfortunately most of us have no immediate "income" help that will happen fast. Again, what you may be able to do there depends upon ANY market in your area. Have you looked into flowers? Yep, some areas may be open to flower sales....florists, roadside, restaurants, etc. Just thinking about WHAT might be doable. Flowers have little expense or fence & feed requirements. :)

    Not being familiar with what niche you may be able to fill in your area does limit our input help. Of course, before having more income, we also look to see how we can reduce spending by any way to sustain ourselves. Generally, providing food and reducing all expenses we can are first -- to release some funds for other goals.
     
  9. Feb 12, 2018
    Glenn Stanford

    Glenn Stanford Exploring the pasture

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    Thanks Mini Horses,
    I have been doing a world of research. I found this one place that I like and may be some solutions to problems.
    Check it out if you don't mind.

    Homeplacepastures.com

    They are not but about 1 to 1-1/2 hours away.
    They have a producer program that sounds good.
    I just finished a email to them asking about that program and showing interest.
    I did explain fencing and shelter will need built prior to stocking.
    What's got me on fire as of late is a program from,
    National Resource Conservation Service they are a division or program from the USDA.gov

    Small Ruminant Farmer Initiative for Mississippi

    Check this out also, I may can get money for fencing, shelter, and livestock. My neighbor told me about it, he had applied and was approved for $25,000 but he is building a house in another county so he can't use it.
    And the USDA rural program will pay 25% of cost for installed solar panels but it expires next month so that's why I am trying to get all my ducks in a row.
    The solar can pay for the electricity used at the barn.
    So I am excited may all be for nothing, but......
    Thanks
     
  10. Feb 12, 2018
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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    Sorry you're in such a tight stretch. Getting older doesn't make things easier all the time. I have a nephew that is autistic and my brother basically walked away from his wife and their 2 kids and his wife's daughter and she did a wonderful job with her son to help him get to a "normal" state. There CAN be light at the end of the tunnel! Caring folks like you and your wife are what it takes though. Still sorry the responsibility fell on y'all. Hope the USDA thing works out for you.