Thistleblooms Rambles

thistlebloom

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Though not your responsibility, those nails are a serious danger to you and others. Do you have one of those rolling magnet metal picker upper things? You could borrow mine if I wasn't 2,000 miles from you.
No, don't have a picker upper dealy bob. Maybe you are in need of a vacation with a little refreshing volunteer work at a scenic western location Bruce. :D =D
Next time I see Ranger Dave or Jim I'll mention it. Maybe they have a magnetic roller.

Holy cow, Miss @thistlebloom, about the nails! I hope you can get them all picked up before Syringa or someone else gets injured. Would you kindly post pictures of the work you did for the garden and chicken area?
Well maybe. It's not really impressive right now. Maybe it never will be come to think of it!
 

thistlebloom

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Went riding yesterday morning bright and early with 3 friends. We swap trail positions regularly so no one horse leads all the time. Here it was Syringa in the lead and there was a deadly burned out tree stump on the left. They are known to leap up and attack horses. Maybe you weren't aware of that problem but Syringa was! Being lead mare her guard was up. She stopped and didn't want to go forward so I had to work her a bit.
The friend behind me said -'what is it?'
Stump! I replied.
'Skunk!? Let's turn around!'
No, stump! Like in tree! 😂

1596203152339.jpeg


It was a good ride mostly. One of the group is a trainer and was on a clients 3 YO gelding that came to her with some issues. He did well, but when we were getting close to the trailhead he came unglued over something and started bucking hard. I didn't see it, I was quite a ways ahead and around a bend, but I heard the commotion and stopped. Her horse came galloping down the trail but fortunately slowed down and I was able to dismount and grab him. My friend was fine, she's young and knows how to land.
That little gelding will be getting some lessons on the thing that started his personal rodeo. I was happy that it ended well and nobody got hurt.

It's been hot here. Supposed to be super hot today. I'm afraid to look at just how hot they are predicting because no more hooky for me. I have to get some work in today.
 

drstratton

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Yesterday evening Syringa and I met friends for another ride. It is an extremely challenging trail that I have only done a small part of a few times.
I must have done the least technical part of it on Luke a few years ago. When it was mentioned as a possibility I said sure! Oh blessed ignorance!
Then my friend asked if Syringa was good crossing water and climbing rocks. I said she wouldn't have a problem... Hoo boy! 😲
I haven't done a trail that tough since my endurance racing days.

Things at first were just normal trail riding, crossing meadows and picking through logged over areas that were pretty much a solid carpet of big sticks. Then we reached the bottom and had a creek crossing. It was not deep, but fairly wide. The two friends leading just stepped right in and let their horses drink, then wandered out. Then it was our turn and Syringa said uh uh. Nope. Not stepping in there.
Many minutes later, I hadn't changed her mind so I got off and led her in. She'll follow me just about anywhere. I remounted in the creek and we went in and out several times no problem.
We headed out again and almost immediately hit the single track switchback trail that climbed about 100* miles through the trees. That's 100* miles straight up over exposed granite boulders and so narrow that you're in danger of leaving knee parts behind on tree trunks. Syringa was a trooper and had no problem sorting out her footing in the tricky parts. I pretty much let her decide where to clamber up.
So, we climb, the sound of horses huffing and 16 hooves on rock. At one point the two lead horses stop and my friends dismount. It was a rock face on one side of the trail and a good drop on the other. I couldn't see my friend in the lead because she was around the turn. They explained we had to dismount in order to make it under the tree that is like a roof beam over the trail. It's not high enough to pass under mounted, and the angle the trail crosses under makes it dangerous to try. My friend behind me was glad she hadn't brought her almost 17 hand gelding because she would have also had to unsaddle him. And probably grease his back.

The trail broadened out some but was still steep and we were passing through thimbleberries. Some were ripe and we reached grubby hands out to grab some as we passed. They sort of squish when you pick them but are so sweet and wonderful they are worth licking your fingers for. You try not to think about what all you are licking in addition to berry smush. I wish I had taken pictures as we rode, but I was kind of busy riding.

At last we reached the top and could see the lake far below us. It was getting close to sunset and they discussed hanging around at the top to watch it. I was mildly alarmed, I didn't sign up for a trail descent through the woods in the dark y'all. But good sense prevailed and we started off again, down the other side. If I thought the ascent was steep, the descent was at least as steep. But it was mostly dirt, much fewer rock outcrops to negotiate. The shrubs growing along each side did have a tendency to rip your head off if you didn't duck backwards in time, your little noggin bouncing off your horses rump. Haha.

The steepness of the trail made my saddle ride up onto Syringas withers which must have been uncomfortable for her, but there wasn't a good place to fix it until we got lower and there were some wide enough spots in the trail to get off and fiddle with it.

Finally we made it back to the trailers at the trail head. My little mustang got huge compliments from my three friends. She handled herself like a seasoned trail horse and never once faltered or offered to quit. She ate the trail up and was looking for more. But she was tired, as were all the other older mares who have many years of trails under their belts. I'm very proud of my girl. I checked her this morning and she was fine. No heat in her legs or back soreness. Yay Syringa.

* not literally 100 miles of course. 😉

At the top. Happy to have survived. 🤣

View attachment 76213
Lovely picture of you & your beautiful girl! 💞

I truly miss my horse... the trail you just went on sounds a bit terrifying...but, I would've been game to try!
 

drstratton

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Thanks all. Sometimes I am just amazed and in wonderment at the quantity of blessings that overflow my cup. Not just my horses and living where I can enjoy spectacular rides, but all the other elements of my life at this point. After I showered the night of that epic ride I started counting my blessings....clean hot water on demand, a clean towel, a house with four good walls and a roof that keep us comfortable in all sorts of weather, a good man that loves me and takes my good and bad generously, two kids who like to hang around with us....well, the list is endless. God is good and merciful and loving, all good things are from Him and I am so grateful.
Amen to all of the above! He is good all of the time! 💞
 

drstratton

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Went riding yesterday morning bright and early with 3 friends. We swap trail positions regularly so no one horse leads all the time. Here it was Syringa in the lead and there was a deadly burned out tree stump on the left. They are known to leap up and attack horses. Maybe you weren't aware of that problem but Syringa was! Being lead mare her guard was up. She stopped and didn't want to go forward so I had to work her a bit.
The friend behind me said -'what is it?'
Stump! I replied.
'Skunk!? Let's turn around!'
No, stump! Like in tree! 😂

View attachment 76548

It was a good ride mostly. One of the group is a trainer and was on a clients 3 YO gelding that came to her with some issues. He did well, but when we were getting close to the trailhead he came unglued over something and started bucking hard. I didn't see it, I was quite a ways ahead and around a bend, but I heard the commotion and stopped. Her horse came galloping down the trail but fortunately slowed down and I was able to dismount and grab him. My friend was fine, she's young and knows how to land.
That little gelding will be getting some lessons on the thing that started his personal rodeo. I was happy that it ended well and nobody got hurt.

It's been hot here. Supposed to be super hot today. I'm afraid to look at just how hot they are predicting because no more hooky for me. I have to get some work in today.
I'm glad your friend was okay!

It's been over 100 at our place most of the week. We're at our sons place in Clarkston right now & on the way here yesterday we went through an area were it was 115! We don't see that very often! Stay cool!
 

thistlebloom

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I don't do heat as well as I used to. 115 is ridiculous, who thought that was a good idea? 😄

The log deck continues to shrink. There are 2 and a half cords split and stacked. The shed will hold 3, and the deck probably will yeild between 10 and 12.
I got that wrong (math not being one of my strong points, haha).
The shed will hold SIX cords, which is more reasonable.

I went to work this morning and forgot the arborists were scheduled there today. They were taking out 3 cedar trees when I arrived, and I had to park at the guest house since their boom truck and the big chipper were blocking the main driveway. I did some deadheading and watered all the containers, but the tree guys had several teams working in different areas and I didn't want to be in the way, so I opted to leave early. It sounded like a real plausible excuse to me anyway. :p
Going back to my truck I was checking out where the cedars had been removed and talked to the boom truck guy for a bit. I was coveting all that cedar wood and said so. He said if they'd known I wanted it they would have loaded my truck up. Darn! A day late and a dollar short as usual!

Well maybe if the boss lady decides to take out the one remaining one that she wanted left I can nab it. That makes some dandy fire starting wood.
 
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