BoboFarm

Loving the herd life
Joined
Jan 12, 2018
Messages
243
Reaction score
344
Points
143
Location
Washoe Valley, Nevada
@Southern by choice We spent a lot of time educating folks on keeping dogs intact. We had to be very careful in our screening process because we had a lot of people wanting a big, tough "rockweiler" that had no interest in putting time into their dogs. By telling us that a pup would be spayed early, even after educating on later spay/neuter, we would usually decide to reject these people because it told us that they would not be willing to put effort into the dog.

We also keep up with all of our pups and know the owners well. We have only had to amend one contract for a male that needed to be neutered before two years old because he kept escaping (breaking through windows) because of an intact female down the road from where he lived.

We all know how rampant poorly bred rotties are. We had a requirement for any people that planned on breeding that the dogs needed all breed specific health clearances, two shows with specific ratings and some kind of working titles. This deterred many people from wanting our pups, which was fine with me. The people that have our pups are people that were willing to put the work in and that's why they were selected.

Have I mentioned that we don't breed anymore? ;)
 

Southern by choice

Herd Master
Joined
Jun 11, 2012
Messages
13,336
Reaction score
14,683
Points
613
Location
North Carolina
@Southern by choice We spent a lot of time educating folks on keeping dogs intact. We had to be very careful in our screening process because we had a lot of people wanting a big, tough "rockweiler" that had no interest in putting time into their dogs. By telling us that a pup would be spayed early, even after educating on later spay/neuter, we would usually decide to reject these people because it told us that they would not be willing to put effort into the dog.

We also keep up with all of our pups and know the owners well. We have only had to amend one contract for a male that needed to be neutered before two years old because he kept escaping (breaking through windows) because of an intact female down the road from where he lived.

We all know how rampant poorly bred rotties are. We had a requirement for any people that planned on breeding that the dogs needed all breed specific health clearances, two shows with specific ratings and some kind of working titles. This deterred many people from wanting our pups, which was fine with me. The people that have our pups are people that were willing to put the work in and that's why they were selected.

Have I mentioned that we don't breed anymore? ;)

I have always viewed it as I will be there for the life of the dog. PERIOD. But matching up by individual dog to individual owners is IMO key.
Some people surprise you both good and bad.
Yeah, I don't like breeding. That is why I only have bred 4 litters in all these years. No accidents, intact animals.
I have spayed medically necessary dogs.
I did decide to neuter my retired LGD that lives in the house. :( Sadly it was a simple fact of a whole lot of people in the house and in and out of the house from different work schedules. If it was just me and one other person -no issues... but 8-9 people paying attention... yeah, that was going to be a potential issue. No way I could risk a 160 Pyr breeding my 50lb 12 year old boxer/lab. IOW everyone in the family has to be responsible and with young adult kids in and out... nah.

LOL I remember in the 80's the "Rock wilder, Rock welder" was the new bad a$$ dog ...:lol::lol::lol:

Most good breeders stop breeding, ultimately it is because of the people.
 

Wehner Homestead

Herd Master
Joined
Nov 28, 2017
Messages
3,492
Reaction score
8,429
Points
443
Location
S Indiana
Queenie is now 7.5 months old! She followed me out to check on Dolly (cow I’m waiting on to calve) and I took a pic over my shoulder. She trails DH or I everywhere!
E4632777-1C06-42E1-B514-291212919DA6.jpeg

Queenie also respects the cows very well. Maddie tolerated her quite well despite having a calf that isn’t even a week old yet!
Maddie and Indy are to the immediate left, just out of the frame.
FCD7275F-5636-4076-A76E-6771FF3898D6.jpeg
 

Wehner Homestead

Herd Master
Joined
Nov 28, 2017
Messages
3,492
Reaction score
8,429
Points
443
Location
S Indiana
Queenie is in heat! :barnie:th She’s almost 8 mos but I expected it to be longer because of her size. Either way, she’s now in confinement and NOT happy. We don’t need any oops too occur with our Aussie male or the neighbor’s lab. She isn’t old enough anyway.

**Jewel (female Aussie) is in heat and in confinement too! Makes for two very unhappy girls!
 

Latestarter

Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry
Golden Herd Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2014
Messages
11,384
Reaction score
17,481
Points
623
Location
NE Texas
Oh man... so sorry but I guess it's a case of double your pleasure, double the fun... Better they both went together rather than dealing with confining them at different times. Good catch! I can only imagine the unhappiness there.
 
Top