Coffee anyone ?

Mini Horses

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So not taking heavy oxy is good but, take something otc to keep that pain at more of a dull ache. Good for tolerance an emotion...I know you know, prob doing. 😀👍. You'll need the ache to keep you from overdoing too soon. :lol: :hugs:love

News about FL all over the place. I'm just wondering why residents on Sanibel -- an ISLAND -- with cat4 heading straight for them, thought they'd be "ok" to just stay!o_O. Evacuation only option IMO. :oops::(

We're getting a couple days of coastal bad weather with wind and rains, more storm surge along the beaches. I'm getting gloomy clouds, maybe an inch of rain tomorrow :idunno. Have fresh hay for rain allergic goats. 🤣

Better get out there....time to milk and feed.
 

Baymule

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Yeah, what part of staying on a sandbar at sea level with a Cat 4, almost Cat 5 roaring towards you, makes staying there a good decision? I’m real sorry for people who are dealing with all the destruction, but that ain’t real smart.

Was watching a program on RFDTV, the commentator threw it out there, “Why should I have to pay higher insurance premiums to pay for people who want to live on the beach? Add to that, earthquakes, flood plains, fire areas, etc. Every place has its drawbacks. Obviously spreading the risk over a wide area and allowing homes to be built in high risk areas, isn’t working out too well.

I don’t think people are well educated on the risks of certain areas. They see only the beauty of that area and brush off the warnings. People have lost everything and many will not recover from this. Flood insurance is expensive and many did not have it.

Know the risks of where you live and know that some day, it’s coming for you. Run. Your life may depend on it. Run.
 

farmerjan

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Add to @Baymule 's comment... knowing the risks also means being willing to pay for the premiums for proper insurance, or understanding that "someone" isn't going to come in and "fix it for you". And being thickheaded or stupid about "riding it out" means that you are taking responsibility for yourself.

On the flip side of that... there are many people who live in those high risk areas BECAUSE that is where the work is. They are often in the lower end of the income brackets... many rent where they are... Many are hand to mouth, paycheck to paycheck, living also... and it costs alot of money to "go and take to the high ground" so to speak and evacuate for several days to an area that is "safer".... they don't give out free rooms in more secure areas for people to stay in... SO many just do not have the money to take an unplannned 2-3-5 day "vacation" of evacuating to someplace safer.....

So what is the answer? I just don't know. I was talking to Deb of the place we make hay just up the road... and she was wondering if we had any problems here since she had decided not to come out due to the rain and all... and she said that she heard on the radio talking about evacuating... that a rough estimate was for it to cost about $1,000 for a couple to evacuate for 3-5 days.... how would a family that was trying to make ends meet afford to do that? I get that those like on the island were being just plain dumb to not value their lives more... but what about places that were just prone to flooding and all that... where evacuating was a smart move....yet how do you afford to do it when there is barely enough to pay the rent and utilities normally?

I don't have the answers. I like the ocean, and all that, but not having grown up there, not "in love with it" and not a "way of life for me".... so I cannot relate to those that it is their life and soul... in their blood so to speak. But I am also not stupid enough to think that I am "different or better than" to think that staying is the smart thing to do. The thing that also gets to me is that growing up in a family where my father was in the fire dept, and they were called to many "rescue" type operations, and seeing the damage that hurricane weather can do even "inland" where we were in Conn.; how can anyone in their right mind think that they should be rescued by another mortal human being putting their life on the line..... if you do not value your own life enough to try to be smart about "saving yourself".... why in the name of "whomever" ... do people think that someone else should be saving them at their own risk of death.....
Getting caught in a situation that is totally unexpected, where you have no prior warning... or such a short warning that to be nearly impossible to do much to prepare; is one thing. They knew about this hurricane for DAYS ahead of time. I think that the Gov was right to tell people that if they had not evacuated, that they were on their own until it was SAFE for rescue workers to go out after it had passed. The rescue people's lives are worth as much if not more, than the fools that stayed behind through their own decision.
 

Baymule

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Many evacuations take into consideration the poor, those without the transportation or means to leave. Most of my life has been spent in hurricane country. Coastal towns used school buses to take people to safer areas. The town I lived in for many years, Livingston, was a shelter town. We put people in our schools and churches. Actually people were supposed to go well past Livingston, but for various reasons couldn’t get any further. There are resources available for people to leave, but with so many people, it just isn’t enough.

It is standard policy for those who decide to stay, have to wait for the hurricane to pass before rescue can begin.
 

Bruce

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I can't feel real bad for people who didn't follow the mandatory evacuation unless they physically couldn't leave. There was a lady on the news (via internet) whose husband had just been released from the hospital. I don't recall the condition but he was paralyzed. No way she could get him anywhere. Her I feel bad for, lots of trauma but they did make it through.

Mandatory apparently is not enforced thus it is merely a suggestion. I see no reason to go rescue people who "rode it out" when under mandatory evacuation orders; stay in your attic until the water goes down then vacate your now destroyed home. There were evacuation sites people could go to, not ideal comfy hotel living but safe. Use the people power to aid those who did evacuate and now have no home to return to.

And, frankly, I don't think people who live in areas known to flood or areas prone to fire should be able to get insurance at all. "Communal" insurance should be for "it COULD happen but isn't likely" to any specific individual or location.

Fort Myers and Sarasota have been affected by hurricanes or tropical storms about every 3 years.

Sorry, sometimes I am a hardass.
 

Mini Horses

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I'm sympathetic for those needing help to leave -- however, there were buses and people to assist and many were not used. There were shelters available. This storm moved it's path BUT even before, the cone included these low lying barrier islands. Sad people won't accept warnings of danger to life. 🤷

Here, we have most all schools closed due to high water conditions on many roads. Military bases are on essential personnel only, etc. Precautions that may be inconvenient but help limit traffic and thus, rescues.....stalled vehicles, accidents, etc. Still winds pushing water around ocean, bay, rivers...still rains. Gloomy! All area power was back on yesterday morning.

Coffee hot and fresh. A real wake up -- glad to have it. Lot of lights on as I try for a bright spot. 😁. Thinking breakfast would be welcome about now -- as well as someone to prepare serve it to me! 🤣🤣 I'm hungry and unmotivated.


ETA...learning more on phone👍😁. Starting to like it....those being pushed into one, it's doable. :lol: :old
 
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Baymule

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Hurricane Rita struck the Texas/Louisiana coast in September 2005. It triggered a mass evacuation in Houston, some 2 million people hit the roads. This was 3 weeks after Katrina hit New Orleans and the panic was on. From Houston to Livingston, normally a 2 hour drive, max, took 24 to 28 hours. People ran out of gas. People died in their cars from the heat. Cars broke down and were left on the side of the road. This was played out on every single road out of Houston, every small town was over run with scared desperate people. I was a Red Cross volunteer and spent nights in the elementary school near our home, and at church. We sheltered friends that lived in mobile homes in our brick home. I'd come home, grab a few hours of sleep and do it all over again. The school bus evacuations brought up this memory. The superintendent of High Island ISD came in the elementary school, out of gas, exhausted and no where to go. He was the last to leave his town, having used every school bus to get other people to safety. His own family were gone and safe. He was, to me, a hero. Now he was stranded. We had no facilities for this, evacuation was supposed to go past our town. He gratefully fell asleep on the gym floor. A Deputy came by to tell us a tanker of gasoline was going to be at a local station at 6 AM. I sent my daughter home to get the lawn mower gas can. At 4, I woke up the superintendent and took him outside. We put the 2 gallons of gas in his car and sent him to get in line at the gas station.

That evacuation was the first of its kind, it was studied to make future evacuations go smoother. It also made me decide to move out of the way of mass pandemonium and never be in the path of anything like that again. 10 years later we retired and moved to Lindale.

We were without power for 3 weeks, right in the middle of town. Outlying areas took longer. We had food and water, but got in the FEMA lines and took water and MRE's to friends that hadn't prepared. When the grocery stores close, there is nothing. When they reopen, there is still nothing. Everything in the cold cases has to be cleaned out, shelves are stripped bare. I can tell you, the atmosphere in a grocery store after it reopens is like being in church. Quiet, grateful, reverent, and respectful, concerned for others, asking how they made out after the storm. It is eerie.

Am I a prepper? Not in an end of the world scenario, but in a disaster way, yes. Know what is coming for you and be ready for it. If you never need it, you are blessed. If you do need it, you will be a lot better off.
 

Honeybee Hill

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Good morning-coffee going in-cup one of one...I may have to venture out of my hotel room if I want another.

We spent the weekend at Mohegan Sun casino, I loved it-it's just beautiful, with hawks flying outside the room, and the decor is amazing. Now we're at Foxwoods...and I'm not a fan. It's huge and inconvenient. Just going to get dinner last night was a crazy hassle. DH and I don't gamble, so we're really just here for his Native American Conference, and I think I'll take a hike in the Pequot trails while he's occupied. There's an entire Tanger Outlet mall here, but I don't see myself shopping just to shop. I'm not a shopper. :idunno

Hurricane Ian was so devastating, I had the weather channel on for days, just watching in horror. We're heading to Orlando next week, so I guess I'll see what Ian did to them-nowhere near what Ft Myers experienced. We got hit with Sandy back on October 30 2012. I remember it vividly-it was DS#2s 12th birthday. We lost power for 13 days, which really didn't affect us that much-we were always campers, and I do keep a pantry of food and water for events like that. Trees down, but compared to some we were truly lucky.
 
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